Educational Technology

A Pilot Study on Teacher-Facing Real-Time Classroom Game Dashboards

Educational games are an increasingly popular teaching tool in modern classrooms. However, the development of complementary tools for teachers facilitating classroom gameplay is lacking. We present the results of a participatory design process for a teacher-facing, real-time game data dashboard. This two-phase process included a workshop to elicit teachers' requirements for such a tool, and a pilot study of our dashboard prototype.

Author/Presenter

Luke Swanson

David Gagnon

Jennifer Scianna

Year
2022
Short Description

Educational games are an increasingly popular teaching tool in modern classrooms. However, the development of complementary tools for teachers facilitating classroom gameplay is lacking. We present the results of a participatory design process for a teacher-facing, real-time game data dashboard.

A Pilot Study on Teacher-Facing Real-Time Classroom Game Dashboards

Educational games are an increasingly popular teaching tool in modern classrooms. However, the development of complementary tools for teachers facilitating classroom gameplay is lacking. We present the results of a participatory design process for a teacher-facing, real-time game data dashboard. This two-phase process included a workshop to elicit teachers' requirements for such a tool, and a pilot study of our dashboard prototype.

Author/Presenter

Luke Swanson

David Gagnon

Jennifer Scianna

Year
2022
Short Description

Educational games are an increasingly popular teaching tool in modern classrooms. However, the development of complementary tools for teachers facilitating classroom gameplay is lacking. We present the results of a participatory design process for a teacher-facing, real-time game data dashboard.

A Pilot Study on Teacher-Facing Real-Time Classroom Game Dashboards

Educational games are an increasingly popular teaching tool in modern classrooms. However, the development of complementary tools for teachers facilitating classroom gameplay is lacking. We present the results of a participatory design process for a teacher-facing, real-time game data dashboard. This two-phase process included a workshop to elicit teachers' requirements for such a tool, and a pilot study of our dashboard prototype.

Author/Presenter

Luke Swanson

David Gagnon

Jennifer Scianna

Year
2022
Short Description

Educational games are an increasingly popular teaching tool in modern classrooms. However, the development of complementary tools for teachers facilitating classroom gameplay is lacking. We present the results of a participatory design process for a teacher-facing, real-time game data dashboard.

Exploring Players' Experience of Humor and Snark in a Grade 3-6 History Practices Game

In this paper we use an existing history learning game with an active audience as a research platform for exploring how humor and "snarkiness" in the dialog script affect students' progression and attitudes about the game. We conducted a 2x2 randomized experiment with 11,804 anonymous 3rd-6th grade students. Using one-way ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis tests, we find that changes to the script produced measurable results in the self-reported perceived humor of the game and the likeability of the player character.

Author/Presenter

David J. Gagnon

Ryan S. Baker

Sarah Gagnon

Luke Swanson

Nick Spevacek

Juliana Andres

Erik Harpstead

Jennifer Scianna

Stefan Slater

Maria O.C.Z. San Pedro

Year
2022
Short Description

In this paper we use an existing history learning game with an active audience as a research platform for exploring how humor and "snarkiness" in the dialog script affect students' progression and attitudes about the game.

Exploring Players' Experience of Humor and Snark in a Grade 3-6 History Practices Game

In this paper we use an existing history learning game with an active audience as a research platform for exploring how humor and "snarkiness" in the dialog script affect students' progression and attitudes about the game. We conducted a 2x2 randomized experiment with 11,804 anonymous 3rd-6th grade students. Using one-way ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis tests, we find that changes to the script produced measurable results in the self-reported perceived humor of the game and the likeability of the player character.

Author/Presenter

David J. Gagnon

Ryan S. Baker

Sarah Gagnon

Luke Swanson

Nick Spevacek

Juliana Andres

Erik Harpstead

Jennifer Scianna

Stefan Slater

Maria O.C.Z. San Pedro

Year
2022
Short Description

In this paper we use an existing history learning game with an active audience as a research platform for exploring how humor and "snarkiness" in the dialog script affect students' progression and attitudes about the game.

Exploring Players' Experience of Humor and Snark in a Grade 3-6 History Practices Game

In this paper we use an existing history learning game with an active audience as a research platform for exploring how humor and "snarkiness" in the dialog script affect students' progression and attitudes about the game. We conducted a 2x2 randomized experiment with 11,804 anonymous 3rd-6th grade students. Using one-way ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis tests, we find that changes to the script produced measurable results in the self-reported perceived humor of the game and the likeability of the player character.

Author/Presenter

David J. Gagnon

Ryan S. Baker

Sarah Gagnon

Luke Swanson

Nick Spevacek

Juliana Andres

Erik Harpstead

Jennifer Scianna

Stefan Slater

Maria O.C.Z. San Pedro

Year
2022
Short Description

In this paper we use an existing history learning game with an active audience as a research platform for exploring how humor and "snarkiness" in the dialog script affect students' progression and attitudes about the game.

Leveraging Cluster Analysis to Understand Educational Game Player Experiences and Support Design

The ability for an educational game designer to understand their audience's play styles and resulting experience is an essential tool for improving their game's design. As a game is subjected to large-scale player testing, the designers require inexpensive, automated methods for categorizing patterns of player-game interactions. In this paper we present a simple, reusable process using best practices for data clustering, feasible for use within a small educational game studio.

Author/Presenter

Luke Swanson

David Gagnon

Jennifer Scianna

John McCloskey

Nicholas Spevacek

Stefan Slater

Erik Harpstead

Year
2022
Short Description

The ability for an educational game designer to understand their audience's play styles and resulting experience is an essential tool for improving their game's design. In this paper we present a simple, reusable process using best practices for data clustering, feasible for use within a small educational game studio.

Leveraging Cluster Analysis to Understand Educational Game Player Experiences and Support Design

The ability for an educational game designer to understand their audience's play styles and resulting experience is an essential tool for improving their game's design. As a game is subjected to large-scale player testing, the designers require inexpensive, automated methods for categorizing patterns of player-game interactions. In this paper we present a simple, reusable process using best practices for data clustering, feasible for use within a small educational game studio.

Author/Presenter

Luke Swanson

David Gagnon

Jennifer Scianna

John McCloskey

Nicholas Spevacek

Stefan Slater

Erik Harpstead

Year
2022
Short Description

The ability for an educational game designer to understand their audience's play styles and resulting experience is an essential tool for improving their game's design. In this paper we present a simple, reusable process using best practices for data clustering, feasible for use within a small educational game studio.

Leveraging Cluster Analysis to Understand Educational Game Player Experiences and Support Design

The ability for an educational game designer to understand their audience's play styles and resulting experience is an essential tool for improving their game's design. As a game is subjected to large-scale player testing, the designers require inexpensive, automated methods for categorizing patterns of player-game interactions. In this paper we present a simple, reusable process using best practices for data clustering, feasible for use within a small educational game studio.

Author/Presenter

Luke Swanson

David Gagnon

Jennifer Scianna

John McCloskey

Nicholas Spevacek

Stefan Slater

Erik Harpstead

Year
2022
Short Description

The ability for an educational game designer to understand their audience's play styles and resulting experience is an essential tool for improving their game's design. In this paper we present a simple, reusable process using best practices for data clustering, feasible for use within a small educational game studio.

Using Fitbits and Heart Rate Variance (HRVa) to Understand Preservice Teacher Experiences in Extended Reality

Extended reality (XR) is increasingly used to support preservice and inservice teacher training. Its use in teacher education has shown promise in improving future educators’ engagement, self-confidence, and noticing skills. Despite this evidence, the field lacks innovative measures to assess outcomes such as those offered through biometric data collection. This article addresses this gap by presenting the findings of a study involving 18 PSTs, who watched a 360 video of an elementary classroom while their heart rate data was gathered.

Author/Presenter

Richard Ferdig

Karl Kosko

Enrico Gandolfi

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2023
Short Description

Extended reality (XR) is increasingly used to support preservice and inservice teacher training. Its use in teacher education has shown promise in improving future educators’ engagement, self-confidence, and noticing skills. Despite this evidence, the field lacks innovative measures to assess outcomes such as those offered through biometric data collection. This article addresses this gap by presenting the findings of a study involving 18 PSTs, who watched a 360 video of an elementary classroom while their heart rate data was gathered.