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Teachers' Orientations Toward Using Student Mathematical Thinking as a Resource During Whole-Class Discussion

Using student mathematical thinking during instruction is valued by the mathematics education community, yet practices surrounding such use remain difficult for teachers to enact well, particularly in the moment during whole-class instruction. Teachers’ orientations—their beliefs, values, and preferences—influence their actions, so one important aspect of understanding teachers’ use of student thinking as a resource is understanding their related orientations.

Author/Presenter: 
Shari L. Stockero, Keith R. Leatham, Mary A. Ochieng, Laura R. Van Zoest & Blake E. Peterson
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

The purpose of this study is to characterize teachers’ orientations toward using student mathematical thinking as a resource during whole-class instruction.

Conceptualizing Important Facets of Teacher Responses to Student Mathematical Thinking

We argue that progress in the area of research on mathematics teacher responses to student thinking could be enhanced were the field to attend more explicitly to important facets of those responses, as well as to related units of analysis. We describe the Teacher Response Coding scheme (TRC) to illustrate how such attention might play out, and then apply the TRC to an excerpt of classroom mathematics discourse to demonstrate the affordances of this approach.
Author/Presenter: 
Laura R. Van Zoest
Blake E. Peterson
Annick O. T. Rougée
Shari L. Stockero
Keith R. Leatham
Ben Freeburn
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

We argue that progress in the area of research on mathematics teacher responses to student thinking could be enhanced were the field to attend more explicitly to important facets of those responses, as well as to related units of analysis. We describe the Teacher Response Coding scheme (TRC) to illustrate how such attention might play out, and then apply the TRC to an excerpt of classroom mathematics discourse to demonstrate the affordances of this approach. We conclude by making several further observations about the potential versatility and power in articulating units of analysis and developing and applying tools that attend to these facets when conducting research on teacher responses.

Clarifiable Ambiguity in Classroom Mathematics Discourse

Ambiguity is a natural part of communication in a mathematics classroom. In this paper, a particular subset of ambiguity is characterized as clarifiable. Clarifiable ambiguity in classroom mathematics discourse is common, frequently goes unaddressed, and unnecessarily hinders in-the-moment communication because it likely could be made more clear in a relatively straightforward way if it were attended to. We argue for deliberate attention to clarifiable ambiguity as a critical aspect of attending to meaning and as a necessary precursor to productive use of student mathematical thinking.

Author/Presenter: 
Blake E. Peterson
Keith R. Leatham
Lindsay M. Merrill
Laura R. Van Zoest
Shari L. Stockero
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

Ambiguity is a natural part of communication in a mathematics classroom. In this paper, a particular subset of ambiguity is characterized as clarifiable. Clarifiable ambiguity in classroom mathematics discourse is common, frequently goes unaddressed, and unnecessarily hinders in-the-moment communication because it likely could be made more clear in a relatively straightforward way if it were attended to. We argue for deliberate attention to clarifiable ambiguity as a critical aspect of attending to meaning and as a necessary precursor to productive use of student mathematical thinking.

Articulating the Student Mathematics in Student Contributions

We draw on our experiences researching teachers’ use of student thinking to theoretically unpack the work of attending to student contributions in order to articulate the student mathematics (SM) of those contribution.

Author/Presenter: 
Laura R. Van Zoest
Shari L. Stockero
Keith R. Leatham
Blake E. Peterson
Joshua M. Ruk
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

We draw on our experiences researching teachers’ use of student thinking to theoretically unpack the work of attending to student contributions in order to articulate the student mathematics (SM) of those contribution.

Visualizing Chemistry Teachers’ Enacted Assessment Design Practices to Better Understand Barriers to “Best Practices”

Even when chemistry teachers’ beliefs about assessment design align with literature-cited best practices, barriers can prevent teachers from enacting those beliefs when developing day-to-day assessments. In this paper, the relationship between high school chemistry teachers’ self-generated “best practices” for developing formative assessments and the assessments they implement in their courses are examined.

Author/Presenter: 
Adam G. L. Schafer
Victoria M. Borlanda
Ellen J. Yezierski
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

In this paper, the relationship between high school chemistry teachers’ self-generated “best practices” for developing formative assessments and the assessments they implement in their courses are examined.

Investigating How Assessment Design Guides High School Chemistry Teachers’ Interpretation of Student Responses to a Planned, Formative Assessment

High school chemistry teachers will often establish goals that guide assessment design and interpretation of assessment results. However, little is known about how these goals and the assessment design collectively guide the interpretation of results. This study seeks to better understand what teachers notice when interpreting assessment results and how the design of the assessment may influence teachers’ patterns of noticing.

Author/Presenter: 
Adam G. L. Schafer
Ellen J. Yezierski
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

This study seeks to better understand what teachers notice when interpreting assessment results and how the design of the assessment may influence teachers’ patterns of noticing. The study described herein investigates high school chemistry teachers’ interpretations of student responses to formative assessment items by identifying patterns in what teachers notice.

Investigating High School Chemistry Teachers’ Assessment Item Generation Processes for a Solubility Lab

Designing high school chemistry assessments is a complex and difficult task. Although prior studies about assessment have offered teachers guidelines and standards as support to generate quality assessment items, little is known about how teachers engage these supports or enact their own beliefs into practice while developing assessments. Presented in this paper are the results from analyzing discourse among five high school chemistry teachers during an assessment item generation activity, including assessment items produced throughout the activity.

Author/Presenter: 
Adam G. L. Schafer
Ellen J. Yezierski
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

Designing high school chemistry assessments is a complex and difficult task. Although prior studies about assessment have offered teachers guidelines and standards as support to generate quality assessment items, little is known about how teachers engage these supports or enact their own beliefs into practice while developing assessments. Presented in this paper are the results from analyzing discourse among five high school chemistry teachers during an assessment item generation activity, including assessment items produced throughout the activity

Think Alouds: Informing Scholarship and Broadening Partnerships through Assessment

Think alouds are valuable tools for academicians, test developers, and practitioners as they provide a unique window into a respondent’s thinking during an assessment. The purpose of this special issue is to highlight novel ways to use think alouds as a means to gather evidence about respondents’ thinking. An intended outcome from this special issue is that readers may better understand think alouds and feel better equipped to use them in practical and research settings.

Author/Presenter: 
Jonathan David Bostic
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

Introduction to special issue focusing on think alouds and response process evidence. This work cuts across STEM education scholarship and introduces readers to robust means to engage in think alouds.

Toward a Productive Definition of Technology in Science and STEM Education

The lack of a definition of the T in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) acronym is pervasive, and it is often the teachers of STEM disciplines who inherit the task of defining the role of technology within their K-12 classrooms. These definitions often vary significantly, and they have profound implications for curricular and instructional goals within science and STEM classrooms.

Author/Presenter: 
Joshua Ellis
Jeanna Wieselmann
Ramya Sivaraj
Gillian Roehrig
Emily Dare
Elizabeth Ring-Whalen
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

This theoretical paper summarizes of technology initiatives across science and STEM education from the past 30 years to present perspectives on the role of technology in science-focused STEM education.

Computational Participation and the Learner‐Technology Pairing in K‐12 STEM Education

The role of technology in STEM education remains unclear and needs stronger operational definition. In this paper, we explore the theoretical connection between STEM and emergent technologies, with a focus on learner behaviors and the potential of technology-mediated experiences with computational participation (CP) in shaping STEM learning. In particular, by de-emphasizing what technology is used and bringing renewed focus to how the technology is used, we make a case for CP as an epistemological and pedagogical approach that promotes collaborative STEM practices.

Author/Presenter: 
Ramya Sivaraj
Joshua A. Ellis
Jeanna R. Wieselmann
Gillian H. Roehrig
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

This paper explores the theoretical connection between STEM and emergent technologies, with a focus on learner behaviors and the potential of technology-mediated experiences with computational participation (CP) in shaping STEM learning.

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