Broadening Participation

Creating Inclusive PreK–12 STEM Learning Environments

Brief CoverBroadening participation in PreK–12 STEM provides ALL students with STEM learning experiences that can prepare them for civic life and the workforce.

Author/Presenter: 
Malcom Butler
Cory Buxton
Odis Johnson Jr.
Leanne Ketterlin-Geller
Catherine McCulloch
Natalie Nielsen
Arthur Powell
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
This brief offers insights from National Science Foundation-supported research for education leaders and policymakers who are broadening participation in science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM). Many of these insights confirm knowledge that has been reported in research literature; however, some offer a different perspective on familiar challenges.

Framing, Adapting, and Applying: Learning to Contextualize Science Activity in Multilingual Science Classrooms

In this article, we turn our attention to context-based approaches to science instruction. We studied the effects of changes to a set of secondary science teacher education programs, all of which were redesigned with attention to the Secondary Science Teaching with English Language and Literacy Acquisition (SSTELLA) instructional framework, a framework for responsive and contextualized instruction in multilingual science classrooms. Contextualizing science activity is one of the key dimensions of the SSTELLA instructional framework.

Author/Presenter: 
Sara Tolbert
Corey Knox
Ivan Salinas
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
This article looks at context-based approaches to science instruction. Authors studied the effects of changes to a set of secondary science teacher education programs, all of which were redesigned with attention to the Secondary Science Teaching with English Language and Literacy Acquisition (SSTELLA) instructional framework, a framework for responsive and contextualized instruction in multilingual science classrooms.

Theorizing reciprocal noticing with non-dominant students in mathematics

In this paper, I theorize reciprocal noticing as a relational practice through which teachers and students exchange roles as knowers by reciprocating each other’s noticing as they study mathematics concepts. Findings from a unit on measuring time implemented in two classrooms with non-dominant students illustrate how teachers and students—through their reciprocal noticing—mobilize concepts back to previous understandings and forward to possible new meanings.

Author/Presenter: 
Higinio Dominguez
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
In this paper, the author theorizes reciprocal noticing as a relational practice through which teachers and students exchange roles as knowers by reciprocating each other’s noticing as they study mathematics concepts.

Engineering for sustainable communities: Epistemic tools in support of equitable and consequential middle school engineering

This study is focused on engineering for sustainable communities (EfSC) in three middle school classrooms. Three in‐depth case studies are presented that explore how two related EfSC epistemic toolsets—(a) community engineering and ethnography tools for defining problems, and (b) integrating perspectives in design specification and optimization through iterative design sketch‐up and prototyping—work to support the following: (a) Students' recruitment of multiple epistemologies; (b) Navigation of multiple epistemologies; and (c) students' onto‐epistemological developments in engineering.

Author/Presenter: 
Edna Tan
Angela Calabrese Barton
Aerin Benavides
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
This study is focused on engineering for sustainable communities (EfSC) in three middle school classrooms.
Resource(s): 

What Matters for Urban Adolescents’ Engagement and Disengagement in School: A Mixed-Methods Study

This study uses a mixed-method sequential exploratory design to examine influences on urban adolescents’ engagement and disengagement in school. First, we interviewed 22 middle and high school students who varied in their level of engagement and disengagement. Support from adults and peers, opportunities to make choices, and external incentives aligned with greater engagement. In contrast, a strict disciplinary structure, an irrelevant and boring curriculum, disengaged peers, and lack of respect by adults coincided with greater disengagement.

Author/Presenter: 
Jennifer A. Fredricks
Alyssa K. Parr
Jamie L. Amemiya
Ming-Te Wang
Scott Brauer
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
This study uses a mixed-method sequential exploratory design to examine influences on urban adolescents’ engagement and disengagement in school.

Student learning emotions in middle school mathematics classrooms: investigating associations with dialogic instructional practices

Emotions are central to how students experience mathematics, yet we know little about how specific instructional practices relate to students’ emotions in mathematics learning. We examined how dialogic instruction, a socially dynamic form of instruction, was associated with four learning emotions in mathematics: enjoyment, pride, anger, and boredom. We also examined whether these associations differed by student gender and prior mathematics achievement.

Author/Presenter: 
Alyssa Parr
Jamie Amemiya
Ming-Te Wang
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
Authors examine how dialogic instruction, a socially dynamic form of instruction, was associated with four learning emotions in mathematics: enjoyment, pride, anger, and boredom.

Does student-centered instruction engage students differently? The moderation effect of student ethnicity

Student-centered instruction is featured in reforms that aim to improve excellence and equity in mathematics education. Although research on stereotype threat suggests that student-centered instruction may have differential effects on racial minority students, the relationship between student-centered mathematics instruction and student engagement remains understudied.

Author/Presenter: 
Eli Talbert
Tara Hofkens
Ming-Te Wang
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
This study examined the relationship between student-centered mathematics instruction and adolescents’ behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and social engagement in mathematics and whether the relationship differed by ethnicity.

Beyond Classroom Academics: A School-Wide and Multi-Contextual Perspective on Student Engagement in School

School engagement researchers have historically focused on academic engagement or academic-related activities. Although academic engagement is vital to adolescents’ educational success, school is a complex developmental context in which adolescents also engage in social interactions while exploring their interests and developing competencies. In this article, school engagement is re-conceptualized as a multi-contextual construct that includes both academic and social contexts of school.

Author/Presenter: 
Ming-Te Wang
Tara L. Hofkens
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
A school-wide and multi-contextual perspective on student engagement in school.

Examining physics identity development through two high school interventions

As part of the STEP UP 4 Women project, a national initiative to empower high school teachers to recruit women to pursue physics degrees in college, we developed two lessons for high school physics classes that are intended to facilitate the physics identity development of female students. One discusses physics careers and links to students' own values and goals; the other focuses on a discussion of underrepresentation of women in physics with the intention of having students elicit and examine stereotypes in physics.

Author/Presenter: 
Hemeng Cheng
Geoff Potvin
Raina Khatri
Laird Kramer
Robynne M. Lock
Zahra Hazari
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
Using structural equation modeling, the researchers test a path model of various physics identity constructs, extending an earlier, established model. In this paper, they also compare a preliminary structural analysis of students' physics identities before and after the career lesson, with an eye towards understanding how students' identities develop over time and due to these experiences.
Resource(s): 

The Computational Algorithmic Thinking (CAT) Capability Flow: An Approach to Articulating CAT Capabilities over Time in African-American Middle-school Girls

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. It involves identifying and understanding a problem, articulating an algorithm or set of algorithms in the form of a solution to the problem, implementing that solution in such a way that the solution solves the problem, and evaluating the solution based on some set of criteria.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita Thomas
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
This paper explores the CAT Capability Flow, which begins to describe the processes and sub-skills and capabilities involve in computational algorithmic thinking (CAT). To do this, authors engage in an approach which results in an initial flowchart that depicts the processes students are engaging in as an iteratively-refined articulation of the steps involved in computational algorithmic thinking.

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