Pre-K

Touchscreen-Based Haptic Information Access for Assisting Blind and Visually-Impaired Users: Perceptual Parameters and Design Guidelines

Touchscreen-based smart devices, such as smartphones and tablets, offer great promise for providing blind and visually-impaired (BVI) users with a means for accessing graphics non-visually. However, they also offer novel challenges as they were primarily developed for use as a visual interface. This paper studies key usability parameters governing accurate rendering of haptically-perceivable graphical materials.

Author/Presenter: 
Hari Prasath Palani
Jennifer L. Tennison
G. Bernard Giudice
Nicholas A. Giudice
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 

This paper studies key usability parameters governing accurate rendering of haptically-perceivable graphical materials

Considerations for STEM Education from PreK through Grade 3

Early Learning Brief

Author/Presenter: 
Julie Sarama
Douglas Clements
Natalie Nielsen
Maria Blanton
Nancy Romance
Mark Hoover
Carolyn Staudt
Arthur Baroody
Christine McWayne
Catherine McCulloch
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 

This brief draws on research supported by the National Science Foundation to highlight important considerations for educators and others who design and provide STEM educational experiences for young children.

The Evidence Based Curriculum Design Framework: Leveraging Diverse Perspectives in the Design Process

This paper describes our approach to integrating the learning sciences with best practices in app design: a design framework that involves researchers and developers in a co-development process to create apps based on research and evidence.

Author/Presenter: 
Philip Vahey
David Reider
Jillian Orr
Ashley Lewis Presser
Ximena Dominguez
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 

The ubiquity of touchscreen, mobile tablet technology has resulted in a plethora of “apps for learning” yet few leverage the learning sciences as a design driver. This paper describes our approach to integrating the learning sciences with best practices in app design: a design framework that involves researchers and developers in a co-development process to create apps based on research and evidence. Our framework centers around a learning blueprint which is intended to serve as a “boundary object.” This boundary object facilitates a design process that allows the design team to focus on both children’s engagement and learning. Here we describe the challenges that our project team encountered and our approaches to overcome those challenges on the Next Generation Preschool Math (NGPM) project, a development and research effort devoted to creating a supplemental preschool math curriculum supplement with integrated digital apps.

Learning and Teaching Measurement: Coordinating Quantity and Number

Smith, J. P., & Barrett, J. E. (2017). The learning and teaching of measurement: Coordinating quantity and number. In J. Cai (Ed.), Compendium for research in mathematics education (pp. 355–385). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Author/Presenter: 
John P. Smith III
Jeffrey E. Barrett
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

This chapter focused on learning and teaching measurement.

Children’s Measurement: A Longitudinal Study of Children’s Knowledge and Learning of Length, Area, and Volume

Quantitative reasoning and measurement competencies support the development of mathematical and scientific thinking in children in the early and middle grades and are fundamental to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. The sixteenth Journal for Research in Mathematics Education (JRME) monograph is a report on a four-year-long multisite longitudinal study that studied children’s thinking and learning about geometric measurement (i.e., length, area, and volume).

Author/Presenter: 
Jeffrey E. Barrett
Douglas H. Clements
Julie Sarama
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

This monograph is a report on a four-year-long multisite longitudinal study that studied children’s thinking and learning about geometric measurement (i.e., length, area, and volume).

Evaluation of three interventions teaching area measurement as spatial structuring to young children

We evaluated the effects of three instructional interventions designed to support young children’s understanding of area measurement as a structuring process.

Author/Presenter: 
Douglas H. Clements
Julie Sarama
Jeffrey E. Barrett
Craig J. Cullen
Aaron Hudyma
Ron Dolgin
Amanda L. Cullen
Cheryl L. Eames
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 

In this article, authors evaluated the effects of three instructional interventions designed to support young children’s understanding of area measurement as a structuring process.

A Pleasure to Measure! Tasks for Teaching Measurement in the Elementary Grades

Measurement is paired with data as a fundamental domain of K–grade 5 mathematics in the Common Core State Standards, and it is one of five core content areas in NCTM’s Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. This book presents lively activities that dovetail with standards and research-based stages of development to support students’ steady growth of understanding of measurement.

Author/Presenter: 
Jeffrey Barrett
Craig Cullen
Diana Behnke
David Klanderman
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

A Pleasure to Measure will enable you to select activities quickly, easily, and confidently to target the content that your students are ready to learn. You’ll find everything that you need in the six E’s that the authors detail for each activity—Essentials, Engage, Explore, Expect, Extend, and Enrich.

Early Childhood Educators’ Self-Efficacy in Science, Math, and Literacy Instruction and Science Practice in the Classroom

Quality early science education is important for addressing the low science achievement, compared to international peers, of elementary students in the United States. Teachers’ beliefs about their skills in a content area, that is, their content self-efficacy is important because it has implications for teaching practice and child outcomes. However, little is known about how teachers’ self-efficacy for literacy, math and science compare and how domain-specific self-efficacy relates to teachers’ practice in the area of science.

Author/Presenter: 
Hope Gerde
Steven Pierce
Kyungsook Lee
Laurie Van Egeren
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

Quality early science education is important for addressing the low science achievement, compared to international peers, of elementary students in the United States. Teachers’ beliefs about their skills in a content area, that is, their content self-efficacy is important because it has implications for teaching practice and child outcomes. However, little is known about how teachers’ self-efficacy for literacy, math and science compare and how domain-specific self-efficacy relates to teachers’ practice in the area of science. Analysis of survey and observation data from 67 Head Start classrooms across eight programs indicated that domain-specific self-efficacy was highest for literacy, significantly lower for science, and lowest for math. Classrooms varied, but in general, engaged in literacy far more than science, contained a modest amount of science materials, and their instructional support of science was low. Importantly, self-efficacy for science, but not literacy or math, related to teachers frequency of engaging children in science instruction. Teachers’ education and experience did not predict self-efficacy for science. Practice or Policy: To enhance the science opportunities provided in early childhood classrooms, pre-service and in-service education programs should provide teachers with content and practices for science rather than focusing exclusively on literacy.

Now more than ever, scientific literacy (i.e., systemizing methods, engaging in critical comparison, utilizing research to inform practice) has been recognized as vital for the 21st-century workforce (National Research Council, 2010 National Research Council. (2010). Exploring the intersection of science education and 21st century skills: A workshop summary. National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academies Press). Strong science education is critical for developing these skills in the U.S. population. However, U.S. elementary children perform below several of their international peers in science achievement tests (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2012). This is not surprising considering that the foundation for scientific understanding is shaky: Elementary teachers spend just 6% to 13% of their instructional time teaching science (NCES, 2012 National Center for Education Statistics. (2012). The condition of education 2012. Retrieved from
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2012/2012045.pdf), and preschool teachers devote even less time (4%–8% of instructional time) to promoting science experiences (Tu, 2006 Tu, T. (2006). Preschool science environment: What is available in a preschool classroom? Early Childhood Education Journal, 33, 245–251. doi:10.1007/s10643-005-0049-8). A primary factor, particularly among early childhood educators, is a lack of preparation for designing and implementing science education, which results in little confidence for teaching science (Greenfield et al., 2009 Greenfield, D. B., Jirout, J., Dominguez, X., Greenberg, A., Maier, M., & Fuccillo, J. (2009). Science in the preschool classroom: A programmatic research agenda to improve science readiness. Early Education & Development, 20, 238–264. doi:10.1080/10409280802595441; Hamlin & Wisneski, 2012 Hamlin, M., & Wisneski, D. B. (2012). Supporting the scientific thinking and inquiry of toddlers and preschoolers through play. Young Children, 67, 82–88). Of course, children are unlikely to develop necessary science knowledge and skills without effective science instruction and experiences (Gelman & Brenneman, 2012 Gelman, R., & Brenneman, K. (2012). Classrooms as learning labs. In N. Stein & S. Raudenbusch (Eds.), Developmental science goes to school (pp. 113–126). New York, NY: Routledge; Morris, Croker, Masnick, & Zimmerman, 2012 Morris, B. J., Croker, S., Masnick, A. M., & Zimmerman, C. (2012). The emergence of scientific reasoning. In H. Kloos, B. J. Morris, & J. L. Amaral (Eds.), Current topics in children’s learning and cognition (pp. 61–82). Rijeka, Croatia: InTech). Thus, one critical research aim fulfilled by the present study was to describe early childhood educator self-efficacy for science and identify how self-efficacy is related to the science opportunities provided in early childhood classrooms.

Family-school partnerships in a context of urgent engagement: Rethinking models, measurement, and meaningfulness

This commentary highlights key themes across the five chapters of this volume, as well as offers specific recommendations concerning future directions for inquiry on the issue of family–school connections. A case is made that in order to advance scientific knowledge of this issue and its application, dialogue is sorely needed that is multidisciplinary, engages mixed methods and emic traditions, and attends to how context shapes family–school connections.

Author/Presenter: 
Christine M. McWayne
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 

This commentary highlights key themes across the five chapters of this volume, as well as offers specific recommendations concerning future directions for inquiry on the issue of family–school connections.

Motivational pathways to STEM career choices: Using expectancy-value perspective to understand individual and gender differences in STEM fields

The United States has made a significant effort and investment in STEM education, yet the size and the composition of the STEM workforce continues to fail to meet demand. It is thus important to understand the barriers and factors that influence individual educational and career choices. In this article, we conduct a literature review of the current knowledge surrounding individual and gender differences in STEM educational and career choices, using expectancy–value theory as a guiding framework.

Author/Presenter: 
Ming-Te Wang
Jessica Degol
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2013
Short Description: 

In this article, we conduct a literature review of the current knowledge surrounding individual and gender differences in STEM educational and career choices, using expectancy–value theory as a guiding framework.

Pages

Subscribe to Pre-K