Computer Science

ScratchJr: A Coding Language for Kindergarten

Computer programming for young children has grown in popularity among both education researchers and product developers, but still relatively little is known about how to assess and track young children’s learning through coding. This study presents an assessment tool to track Kindergarten through second grade students’ learning after engaging in a programming curriculum. Researchers worked with N=57 Kindergarten through second grade students over seven weeks to implement a curriculum using ScratchJr to introduce concepts of sequencing to create animated stories, collages, and games.

Author/Presenter: 
Amanda Strawhacker
Dylan Portelance
Marina Bers
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 

A paper on the prototype evolution of the ScratchJr programming environment.

Towards ITS Authoring Tool s for Domain Experts

The scarcity of efficient and user-friendly authoring tools has long been acknowledged as a limiting factor in the widespread development and deployment of intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs). Creating an effective authoring tool for domain experts poses two significant challenges: it must facilitate the creation of curricular content by domain experts who are typically neither ITS experts nor software engineers, and it must support the creation or modification of ITS-specific pedagogical strategies without exposing the complexity of the ITS itself to the domain expert.

Author/Presenter: 
Robert Taylor
Andy Smith
Samuel Leeman-Munk
Bradford Mott
James Lester
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 

This paper presents a set of authoring tool design principles such as leveraging UI workflows, collaboration, and automation.

Scaffolding Argumentation about Water Quality: A Mixed-method Study in a Rural Middle School

A common way for students to develop scientific argumentation abilities is through argumentation about socioscientific issues, defined as scientific problems with social, ethical, and moral aspects. Computer-based scaffolding can support students in this process. In this mixed method study, we examined the use and impact of computer based scaffolding to support middle school students’ creation of evidence-based arguments during a 3-week problem-based learning unit focused on the water quality of a local river.

Author/Presenter: 
Brian R. Belland
Jiangyue Gu
Sara Armbrust
Brant Cook
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 

In this mixed method study, we examined the use and impact of computer based scaffolding to support middle school students’ creation of evidence-based arguments during a 3-week problem-based learning unit focused on the water quality of a local river. We found a significant and substantial impact on the argument evaluation ability of lower-achieving students, and preliminary evidence of an impact on argument evaluation ability among low-SES students. We also found that students used the various available support—computer-based scaffolding, teacher scaffolding, and groupmate support—in different ways to counter differing challenges. We then formulated changes to the scaffolds on the basis of research results.

A Pilot Meta-Analysis of Computer-Based Scaffolding in STEM Education

This paper employs meta-analysis to determine the influence of computer-based scaffolding characteristics and study and test scorequality on cognitive outcomes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at the secondary, college, graduate, and adult levels.

Author/Presenter: 
Brian R. Belland
Andrew E. Walker
Megan Whitney Olsen
Heather Leary
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015

Pages

Subscribe to Computer Science