Computer Science

Scaffolding Argumentation about Water Quality: A Mixed-method Study in a Rural Middle School

A common way for students to develop scientific argumentation abilities is through argumentation about socioscientific issues, defined as scientific problems with social, ethical, and moral aspects. Computer-based scaffolding can support students in this process. In this mixed method study, we examined the use and impact of computer based scaffolding to support middle school students’ creation of evidence-based arguments during a 3-week problem-based learning unit focused on the water quality of a local river.

Author/Presenter: 
Brian R. Belland
Jiangyue Gu
Sara Armbrust
Brant Cook
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 
In this mixed method study, we examined the use and impact of computer based scaffolding to support middle school students’ creation of evidence-based arguments during a 3-week problem-based learning unit focused on the water quality of a local river. We found a significant and substantial impact on the argument evaluation ability of lower-achieving students, and preliminary evidence of an impact on argument evaluation ability among low-SES students. We also found that students used the various available support—computer-based scaffolding, teacher scaffolding, and groupmate support—in different ways to counter differing challenges. We then formulated changes to the scaffolds on the basis of research results.

A Pilot Meta-Analysis of Computer-Based Scaffolding in STEM Education

This paper employs meta-analysis to determine the influence of computer-based scaffolding characteristics and study and test scorequality on cognitive outcomes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at the secondary, college, graduate, and adult levels.

Author/Presenter: 
Brian R. Belland
Andrew E. Walker
Megan Whitney Olsen
Heather Leary
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015

Engaging underrepresented groups in high school introductory computing through computational remixing with EarSketch

In this paper, we describe a pilot study of EarSketch, a computational remixing approach to introductory computer science, in a formal academic computing course at the high school level. The EarSketch project provides an integrated curriculum, Python API, digital audio workstation (DAW), audio loop library, and social sharing site. The goal for EarSketch is to broaden participation in computing, particularly by traditionally underrepresented groups, through a thickly authentic learning environment that has personal and industry relevance in both computational and artistic domains.

Author/Presenter: 
Jason Freeman
Brian Magerko
Tom McKlin
Mike Reilly
Justin Permar
Cameron Summers
Eric Fruchter
Year: 
2014

Use of Google Earth, Cyber Databases, and Geotagged Photos to Enhance Students’ Scientific Practices and Understanding

Wang, S.-K. Hsu, H.-Y. & Jean Posada. (2014). Use of Google Earth, Cyber Databases, and Geotagged Photos to Enhance Students’ Scientific Practices and Understanding. Science Scope, 37(6), 37-42.

Author/Presenter: 
Shiang-Kwei Wang
Hui-Yin Hsu
Jean Posada
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 
Using Google Earth, Cyber Databases, and Geotagged Photos to Enhance Students’ Scientific Practices and Understanding of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution

An Investigation of Middle School Science Teachers and Students Use of Technology Inside and Outside of Classrooms: Considering whether digital natives are more technology savvy than their teachers

The purpose of the study is to investigate the popular assumption that the "digital natives" generation surpasses the previous "digital immigrants" generation in terms of their technology experiences, because they grow up with information and communication technology. The assumption presumes that teachers, the digital immigrants, are less technology savvy than the digital natives, resulting in a disconnect between students’ technology experiences inside and outside of the formal school setting.

Author/Presenter: 
Shiang-Kwei Wang
Hui-Yin Hsu
Todd Campbell
Daniel C. Coster
Max Longhurst
Year: 
2014

ScratchEd: Working with Teachers to Develop Design-Based Learning Approaches to the Cultivation of Computational Thinking

Author/Presenter: 
Karen Brennan
Mitch Resnick
Year: 
2010
Short Description: 
In this poster, we describe the goals of our research, our proposed model for professional development, our framing of design-based approaches to learning, and our framing of computational thinking.

A View of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Research and its Lessons for Future-Generation Collaboration Systems

Stahl, G. (2012f). A view of computer-supported collaborative learning research and its lessons for future-generation collaboration systems. Future Generation Computer Systems.

ABSTRACT:

Author/Presenter: 
Gerry Stahl
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012

ScratchEd: Working with Teachers to Develop Design-Based Learning Approaches to the Cultivation of Computational Thinking

Presenter(s): 
Karen Brennan
Mitch Resnick
Year: 
2010
Month: 
December
Target Audience: 

In this poster, we describe the goals of our research, our proposed model for professional development, our framing of design-based approaches to learning, and our framing of computational thinking.

Presentation Type: 

American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The American Educational Research Association (AERA), founded in 1916, is concerned with improving the educational process by encouraging scholarly inquiry related to education and evaluation and by promoting the dissemination and practical application of research results. 

Target Audience: 

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