Computer Science

Exploring African American Middle-School Girls' Perceptions of Themselves as Game Designers

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) is a longitudinal project that explores the development of CAT capabilities by guiding African American middle-school girls through the iterative game design cycle, resulting in a set of complex games around broad themes.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita O. Thomas
Rachelle Minor
O. Carlette Odemwingie
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 
This paper explores African American middle-school girls' perspectives of their experience with the Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) project and perceptions of themselves as game designers.

Exploring the Difficulties African-American Middle School Girls Face Enacting Computational Algorithmic Thinking over three Years while Designing Games for Social Change

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. It involves identifying and understanding a problem, articulating an algorithm or set of algorithms in the form of a solution to the problem, implementing that solution in such a way that the solution solves the problem, and evaluating the solution based on some set of criteria.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita O. Thomas
Yolanda Rankin
Rachelle Minor
Li Sun
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 
This article explores middle school girls' reflections about the difficulties they faced while using computational algorithmic thinking capabilities as they engaged in collaborative game design for social change. Authors focus on how these difficulties changed over the course of three years as well as new difficulties that emerged from year to year as girls become more expert game designers and computational algorithmic thinkers.

Understanding the Difficulties African-American Middle School Girls Face While Enacting Computational Algorithmic Thinking in the Context of Game Design

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. It involves identifying and understanding a problem, articulating an algorithm or set of algorithms in the form of a solution to the problem, implementing that solution in such a way that it solves the problem, and evaluating the solution based on some set of criteria. CAT has roots in Mathematics, through problem solving and algorithmic thinking. CAT lies at the heart of Computer Science, which is defined as the study of algorithms.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita O. Thomas
O. Carlette Odemwingie
Quimeka Saunders
Malika Watlerd
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 
This article introduces CAT as explored through the Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) project, an ongoing longitudinal between-subjects research project and enrichment program that guides African-American middle school girls (SCAT Scholars) through the iterative game design cycle resulting in a set of complex games around broad themes.

2019 International Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning; Lyon, France

Event Date: 
Mon, 06/17/2019 (All day) to Fri, 06/21/2019 (All day)
Associated Dates and Deadlines: 

To learn more, visit https://www.cscl2019.com/en/-home/4.

DRK-12 Presenters:

  • Camillia Matuk*, New York University
  • Nadav Ehrenfeld and Ilana Horn, Vanderbilt University

*Denotes CADRE Fellow or Fellows alumnus

Event Type: 
Discipline / Topic: 

STEAM-Based Interventions in Computer Science: Understanding Feedback Loops in the Classroom

Many organizations are seeking to address the need for greater numbers of computer scientists in the US, and in particular, more women and underrepresented minorities. It is not uncommon to develop curriculum that relies heavily on cutting edge technology and computing tools designed to make computing more compelling. Many curriculum developers are seeking to promote creativity as a part of computing, and often do so using STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) based interventions where the arts play a prominent role in the classroom.

Author/Presenter: 
Roxanne Moore
Michael Helms
Michael Helms
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 
In this paper, authors present the causal loop diagrams developed to explain the relationships between the actors and attributes involved in implementing EarSketch in a particular school setting. The diagram allows us to better make decisions that ensure both an engaging but also effective STEAM-based computing curriculum.

Turn-Taking and Chatting in Collaborative Music Live Coding

Co-located collaborative live coding is a potential approach to network music and to the music improvisation practice known as live coding. A common strategy to support communication between live coders and the audience is the use of a chat window. However, paying attention to simultaneous multi-user actions, such as chat texts and code, can be too demanding to follow. In this paper, we explore collaborative music live coding (CMLC) using the live coding environment and pedagogical tool EarSketch.

Author/Presenter: 
Anna Xambó
Pratik Shah
Gerard Roma
Jason Freeman
Brian Magerko
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 
In this paper, authors explore collaborative music live coding (CMLC) using the live coding environment and pedagogical tool EarSketch. In particular, we examine the use of turn-taking and a customized chat window inspired by the practice of pair programming, a team-based strategy to efficiently solving computational problems.

Authenticity and Personal Creativity: How EarSketch Affects Student Persistence

McKlin, T., Magerko, B., Lee, T., Wanzer, D., Edwards, D., & Freeman, J. (2018). Authenticity and personal creativity: How EarSketch affects student persistence. In Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2018). New York, NY: ACM Publications.

Author/Presenter: 
Tom McKlin
Brian Magerko
Taneisha Lee
Dana Wanzer
Doug Edwards
Jason Freeman
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
This conference paper explains how EarSketch affects student persistence.

eColloq Webinar: Cyberlearning Tools for Mobile, Community Engaged, and Connected Learning

Event Date: 
Wed, 12/06/2017 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Associated Dates and Deadlines: 

The second webinar in a new eColloq Series on Cyberlearning featured presentations by Katie Headrick Taylor and Tom Moher on their research, followed by discussion. The eColloq will be chaired by Michael Hoffmann, Georgia Institute of Technology.

REGISTER 

Event Type: 

MSPnet Academy: Infusing Computational Thinking into Science Education

The Santa Fe Institute has been developing programs and curricula that infuse computational thinking into Science education for the past 12 years. In this webinar, presenters describe how the study of Complex Adaptive Systems through computer modeling and simulation fits into existing science frameworks and classes, share information about their program and curricula, and describe the professional development needed to prepare Science teachers to address the computational thinking practices presented in the NRC framework and NGSS.

Author/Presenter: 
Irene Lee
Paige Prescott
Maureen Psaila-Dombrowski
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 
In this webinar, presenters describe how the study of Complex Adaptive Systems through computer modeling and simulation fits into existing science frameworks and classes, share information about their program and curricula, and describe the professional development needed to prepare Science teachers to address the computational thinking practices presented in the NRC framework and NGSS.

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