Climate Change

Wildfire Risks & Impacts

The Wildfire Module asks students to consider the question, "How will wildfire risks and impacts change over the next 100 years?" This five-activity module helps students build an understanding of the variables that influence fire spread rate and intensity, the risks that wildfires bring to people and their communities, and the impact of climate change through focused case studies and interactions with the Wildfire Explorer model. 

Author/Presenter: 
Amy Pallant
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

The Wildfire Module asks students to consider the question, "How will wildfire risks and impacts change over the next 100 years?" This five-activity module helps students build an understanding of the variables that influence fire spread rate and intensity, the risks that wildfires bring to people and their communities, and the impact of climate change through focused case studies and interactions with the Wildfire Explorer model.

Easy Global Climate Modeling (EzGCM) Toolkit

EzGCM is a climate modeling toolkit that allows students to examine climate change using the same tools and following the same scientific processes as climate scientists.

Author/Presenter: 
The EzGCM Team
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

EzGCM is a climate modeling toolkit that allows students to examine climate change using the same tools and following the same scientific processes as climate scientists.

CHANGE Curriculum

CHANGE provides a website, https://climatechange.usf.edu/ which includes nine units from a marine sciences course, complete with lesson plans involving inexpensive, easy to find materials, Powerpoints, downloadable files and an interactive web-based eBook with simulation-based games.

Author/Presenter: 
The CHANGE Team
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 

Nine units for high school-level Marine Science classes: (1) Ocean Exploration, (2) Marine Geology, (3) Marine Chemistry, (4) Estuaries, (5) Marine Physics, (6) Populations: Producers, (7) Populations: Invertebrates, (8) Populations: Vertebrates and (9) Capstone: Apollo Beach. All of these materials can be potentially repurposed for other high school science courses. The units include lesson plans involving inexpensive, easy to find materials, Powerpoints, downloadable files and an interactive web-based eBook with simulation-based games. Teachers can view the top level, outline of the CHANGE curriculum web-page: https://climatechange.usf.edu/. However, to access the actual materials, they will need to register to get a username, by emailing Dr. Glenn Smith: glenns@usf.edu and metinbesalti@mail.usf.edu

Hurricane Risk & Impact

Students will use the Hurricane Explorer model to explain and predict how the path and strength of a hurricane can change, investigate real-world case studies on the risk and impact of hurricanes, and explore the effect of rising global temperatures on hurricanes.

Author/Presenter: 
Amy Pallant
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

Students will use the Hurricane Explorer model to explain and predict how the path and strength of a hurricane can change, investigate real-world case studies on the risk and impact of hurricanes, and explore the effect of rising global temperatures on hurricanes.

The Effect of Automated Feedback on Revision Behavior and Learning Gains in Formative Assessment of Scientific Argument Writing

Application of new automated scoring technologies, such as natural language processing and machine learning, makes it possible to provide automated feedback on students' short written responses. Even though many studies investigated the automated feedback in the computer-mediated learning environments, most of them focused on the multiple-choice items instead of the constructed response items. This study focuses on the latter and investigates a formative feedback system integrated into an online science curriculum module teaching climate change.

Author/Presenter: 
Mengxiao Zhu
Ou Lydia Liu
Hee-Sun Lee
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

This study investigates a formative feedback system integrated into an online science curriculum module teaching climate change.

Appendix 5 of the California Science Framework: Computer Science in Science

This appendix of the California Science Framework focuses on Computer Science in Science.

Citation: Lee, I.2016. California Science Framework. Appendix 5: Computer Science in Science  Retrieved on 11-15-16 at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/sc/cf/scifw2nd60daypubreview.asp

Author/Presenter: 
Irene Lee
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2016
Short Description: 

This appendix of the California Science Framework focuses on Computer Science in Science.

Constructing Scientific Arguments Using Evidence from Dynamic Computational Climate Models

Pallant, A., & Lee H.-S. (2015). Constructing scientific arguments using evidence from dynamic computational climate models. Journal of Science Education and Technology. 24 (2-3) 378-395. doi 10.1007/s10956-014-9499-3.

Author/Presenter: 
Amy Pallant
Hee-Sun Lee
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 

Modeling and argumentation are two important scientific practices students need to develop throughout school years. In this paper, we investigated how middle and high school students (N=512) construct a scientific argument based on evidence from computational models with which they simulated climate change. We designed scientific argumentation tasks with three increasingly complex dynamic climate models. Each scientific argumentation task consisted of four parts: multiple-choice claim, open ended explanation, five-point Likert scale uncertainty rating, and open-ended uncertainty rationale.
We coded 1,294 scientific arguments in terms of a claim’s consistency with current scientific consensus, whether explanations were model based or knowledge based and categorized the sources of uncertainty (personal vs. scientific). We used chi-square and ANOVA tests to identify significant patterns. Results indicate that (1) a majority of students incorporated models as evidence to support their claims, (2) most students used model output results shown on graphs to confirm their claim rather than to explain simulated molecular processes, (3) students’ dependence on model results and their uncertainty rating diminished as the dynamic climate models became more and more complex, (4) some students’ misconceptions interfered with observing and interpreting model results or simulated processes, and (5) students’ uncertainty sources reflected more frequently on their assessment of personal knowledge or abilities related to the tasks than on their critical examination of scientific evidence resulting from models. These findings have implications for teaching and research related to the integration of scientific argumentation and modeling practices to address complex Earth systems.

Assessment of uncertainty-infused scientific argumentation

Lee, H-S, Liu, O.L, Pallant, A., Roohr, K. C., Pryputniewicz, S., & Buck, Z. (2014). Assessment of uncertainty-infused scientific argumentation. The Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 51(5), 581-605.

Author/Presenter: 
Hee-Sun Lee
Lydia Liu
Amy Pallant
Katrina Crotts Roohr
Sarah Pryputniewicz
Zoë E. Buck
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 

Though addressing sources of uncertainty is an important part of doing science, it has largely been neglected in assessing students' scientific argumentation. In this study, we initially defined a scientific argumentation construct in four structural elements consisting of claim, justification, uncertainty qualifier, and uncertainty rationale. We consulted literature to characterize and score different levels of student performances on each of these four argumentation elements. We designed a test comprised of nine scientific argumentation tasks addressing climate change, the search for life in space, and fresh water availability and administered it to 473 students from 9 high schools in the United States. After testing the local dependence and unidimensionality assumptions, we found that the uncertainty qualifier element was not aligned with the other three. After removing items related to uncertainty qualifier, we applied a Rasch analysis based on a Partial Credit Model. Results indicate that (1) claim, justification, and uncertainty rationale items form a unidimensional scale, (2) justification and uncertainty rationale items contribute the most on the unidimensional scientific argumentation scale as they cover much wider ranges of the scale than claim items, (3) average item difficulties increase in the order of claim, justification, and uncertainty rationale, (4) students' elaboration of uncertainty exhibits dual characteristics: self-assessment of their own knowledge and ability versus scientific assessment of conceptual and empirical errors embedded in investigations, and (5) students who can make warrants between theory and evidence are more likely to think about uncertainty from scientific sources than those who cannot. We identified limitations of this study in terms of science topic coverage and sample selection and made suggestions on how these limitations might have affected results and interpretations.

Moving Toward Collective Impact on Climate and Global Change Education

Day: 
Tues

Participants discuss and identify what coordination is needed across DR K12 efforts to enable sustained collective impact on the issues presented by climate, global, and environmental change.

Date/Time: 
1:45 pm to 3:45 pm
2014 Session Types: 
Collaborative Panel Session
Session Materials: 

DR K12 projects have been funded to conduct (1) activities and develop materials that are beneficial to the STEM education community (teachers and students) and (2) education research to ensure continuous improvement of these activities and materials.

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