Classroom Practice

Developing Transmedia Engineering Curricula Using Cognitive Tools to Impact Learning and the Development of STEM Identity

This paper examines the use of Imaginative Education (IE) to create an NGSS-aligned middle school engineering curriculum that supports transfer and the development of STEM identity. In IE, cognitive tools—such as developmentally appropriate narratives, mysteries and fantasies—are used to design learning environments that both engage learners and help them organize knowledge productively. We have combined IE with transmedia storytelling to develop two multi-week engineering units and six shorter engineering lessons.

Author/Presenter: 
Glenn W. Ellis
Jeremiah Pina
Rebecca Mazur
Al Rudnitsky
Beth McGinnis-Cavanaugh
Isabel Huff
Sonia Ellis
Crystal M. Ford
Kate Lytton
Kaia Claire Cormier
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

This paper examines the use of Imaginative Education (IE) to create an NGSS-aligned middle school engineering curriculum that supports transfer and the development of STEM identity.

Resource(s): 

Profiles of Middle School Science Teachers: Accounting for Cognitive and Motivational Characteristics

Teachers play a critical role in successfully implementing science education reforms in the United States to provide high‐quality science learning opportunities to all students. However, the differentiated ways in which teachers make decisions about their science teaching are not well understood.

Author/Presenter: 
Christine L. Bae
Kathryn N. Hayes
Morgan DeBusk‐Lane
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

This study takes a person‐centered approach by applying latent profile analysis to examine how cognitive (pedagogical content knowledge) and motivational (instructional goal orientations, self‐efficacy beliefs, and reform values) characteristics combine to form science teacher profiles in middle school.

Resource(s): 

Disciplinary Literacy in STEM: A Functional Approach

This study explores disciplinary literacy instruction integrated within an elementary engineering unit in an urban classroom. A multidisciplinary team of university literacy and engineering educators and classroom teachers served as the research team for this case study. A social semiotic language theory (systemic functional linguistics) and a framework of mechanistic reasoning informed the instruction and analysis of classroom discourse and student writing.

Author/Presenter: 
Patricia Paugh
Kristen Wendell
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

This study explores disciplinary literacy instruction integrated within an elementary engineering unit in an urban classroom.

Teachers' Responses to Instances of Student Mathematical Thinking with Varied Potential to Support Student Learning

Teacher responses to student mathematical thinking (SMT) matter because the way in which teachers respond affects student learning. Although studies have provided important insights into the nature of teacher responses, little is known about the extent to which these responses take into account the potential of the instance of SMT to support learning. This study investigated teachers’ responses to a common set of instances of SMT with varied potential to support students’ mathematical learning, as well as the productivity of such responses.

Author/Presenter: 
Shari L. Stockero
Laura R. Van Zoest
Ben Freeburn
Blake E. Peterson
Keith R. Leatham
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

This study investigated teachers’ responses to a common set of instances of student mathematical thinking (SMT) with varied potential to support students’ mathematical learning, as well as the productivity of such responses.

Teachers' Orientations Toward Using Student Mathematical Thinking as a Resource During Whole-Class Discussion

Using student mathematical thinking during instruction is valued by the mathematics education community, yet practices surrounding such use remain difficult for teachers to enact well, particularly in the moment during whole-class instruction. Teachers’ orientations—their beliefs, values, and preferences—influence their actions, so one important aspect of understanding teachers’ use of student thinking as a resource is understanding their related orientations.

Author/Presenter: 
Shari L. Stockero, Keith R. Leatham, Mary A. Ochieng, Laura R. Van Zoest & Blake E. Peterson
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

The purpose of this study is to characterize teachers’ orientations toward using student mathematical thinking as a resource during whole-class instruction.

Conceptualizing Important Facets of Teacher Responses to Student Mathematical Thinking

We argue that progress in the area of research on mathematics teacher responses to student thinking could be enhanced were the field to attend more explicitly to important facets of those responses, as well as to related units of analysis. We describe the Teacher Response Coding scheme (TRC) to illustrate how such attention might play out, and then apply the TRC to an excerpt of classroom mathematics discourse to demonstrate the affordances of this approach.
Author/Presenter: 
Laura R. Van Zoest
Blake E. Peterson
Annick O. T. Rougée
Shari L. Stockero
Keith R. Leatham
Ben Freeburn
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

We argue that progress in the area of research on mathematics teacher responses to student thinking could be enhanced were the field to attend more explicitly to important facets of those responses, as well as to related units of analysis. We describe the Teacher Response Coding scheme (TRC) to illustrate how such attention might play out, and then apply the TRC to an excerpt of classroom mathematics discourse to demonstrate the affordances of this approach. We conclude by making several further observations about the potential versatility and power in articulating units of analysis and developing and applying tools that attend to these facets when conducting research on teacher responses.

Clarifiable Ambiguity in Classroom Mathematics Discourse

Ambiguity is a natural part of communication in a mathematics classroom. In this paper, a particular subset of ambiguity is characterized as clarifiable. Clarifiable ambiguity in classroom mathematics discourse is common, frequently goes unaddressed, and unnecessarily hinders in-the-moment communication because it likely could be made more clear in a relatively straightforward way if it were attended to. We argue for deliberate attention to clarifiable ambiguity as a critical aspect of attending to meaning and as a necessary precursor to productive use of student mathematical thinking.

Author/Presenter: 
Blake E. Peterson
Keith R. Leatham
Lindsay M. Merrill
Laura R. Van Zoest
Shari L. Stockero
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

Ambiguity is a natural part of communication in a mathematics classroom. In this paper, a particular subset of ambiguity is characterized as clarifiable. Clarifiable ambiguity in classroom mathematics discourse is common, frequently goes unaddressed, and unnecessarily hinders in-the-moment communication because it likely could be made more clear in a relatively straightforward way if it were attended to. We argue for deliberate attention to clarifiable ambiguity as a critical aspect of attending to meaning and as a necessary precursor to productive use of student mathematical thinking.

Think Alouds: Informing Scholarship and Broadening Partnerships through Assessment

Think alouds are valuable tools for academicians, test developers, and practitioners as they provide a unique window into a respondent’s thinking during an assessment. The purpose of this special issue is to highlight novel ways to use think alouds as a means to gather evidence about respondents’ thinking. An intended outcome from this special issue is that readers may better understand think alouds and feel better equipped to use them in practical and research settings.

Author/Presenter: 
Jonathan David Bostic
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

Introduction to special issue focusing on think alouds and response process evidence. This work cuts across STEM education scholarship and introduces readers to robust means to engage in think alouds.

Gathering Response Process Data for a Problem-Solving Measure through Whole-Class Think Alouds

Response process validity evidence provides a window into a respondent’s cognitive processing. The purpose of this study is to describe a new data collection tool called a whole-class think aloud (WCTA). This work is performed as part of test development for a series of problem-solving measures to be used in elementary and middle grades. Data from third-grade students were collected in a 1–1 think-aloud setting and compared to data from similar students as part of WCTAs. Findings indicated that students performed similarly on the items when the two think-aloud settings were compared.

Author/Presenter: 
Jonathan David Bostic
Toni A. Sondergeld
Gabriel Matney
Gregory Stone
Tiara Hicks
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

This is a description of a new methodological tool to gather response process validity evidence. The context is scholarship within mathematics education contexts.

“Teaching Them How to Fish”: Learning to Learn and Teach Responsively

The Responsive Math Teaching (RMT) project’s 3-year model for professional development introduces teachers to a new instructional model through a full year of monthly Math Circles, where they experience problem solving and productive struggle from the student perspective while working through challenging open-ended tasks, engaging in mathematical discussions, and reflecting on the process. This paper examines teachers’ views of what they learned from this experience and how it affected both their instructional practices and their visions of mathematics teaching and learning.
Author/Presenter: 
Caroline B. Ebby
Brittany Hess
Lizzy Pecora
Jennifer Valerio
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

The Responsive Math Teaching (RMT) project’s 3-year model for professional development introduces teachers to a new instructional model through a full year of monthly Math Circles, where they experience problem solving and productive struggle from the student perspective while working through challenging open-ended tasks, engaging in mathematical discussions, and reflecting on the process. This paper examines teachers’ views of what they learned from this experience and how it affected both their instructional practices and their visions of mathematics teaching and learning.

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