Student Attitudes/Beliefs

STEP UP: Supporting Teachers in Having Difficult Conversations

While the field of physics has become more diverse over the last few decades, it does not reflect the demographics of the population of the United States by any metric. Founded in 2017, the STEP UP program began as a partnership between the American Physical Society (APS), the American Association of Physics Teachers, Florida International University, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Bree Barnett Dreyfuss

Year
2023
Short Description

The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics. After participating in the lessons, research showed that both the students’ sense of physics identity and their intentions to pursue a physics major increased, especially among female-identifying students.

STEP UP: Supporting Teachers in Having Difficult Conversations

While the field of physics has become more diverse over the last few decades, it does not reflect the demographics of the population of the United States by any metric. Founded in 2017, the STEP UP program began as a partnership between the American Physical Society (APS), the American Association of Physics Teachers, Florida International University, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Bree Barnett Dreyfuss

Year
2023
Short Description

The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics. After participating in the lessons, research showed that both the students’ sense of physics identity and their intentions to pursue a physics major increased, especially among female-identifying students.

STEP UP: Supporting Teachers in Having Difficult Conversations

While the field of physics has become more diverse over the last few decades, it does not reflect the demographics of the population of the United States by any metric. Founded in 2017, the STEP UP program began as a partnership between the American Physical Society (APS), the American Association of Physics Teachers, Florida International University, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Bree Barnett Dreyfuss

Year
2023
Short Description

The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics. After participating in the lessons, research showed that both the students’ sense of physics identity and their intentions to pursue a physics major increased, especially among female-identifying students.

STEP UP: Supporting Teachers in Having Difficult Conversations

While the field of physics has become more diverse over the last few decades, it does not reflect the demographics of the population of the United States by any metric. Founded in 2017, the STEP UP program began as a partnership between the American Physical Society (APS), the American Association of Physics Teachers, Florida International University, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Bree Barnett Dreyfuss

Year
2023
Short Description

The project research team developed two active learning lessons examining the diverse profiles of individuals who earned a bachelor’s degree in physics, and issues of marginalization of women in physics. After participating in the lessons, research showed that both the students’ sense of physics identity and their intentions to pursue a physics major increased, especially among female-identifying students.

Examining the Effect of Counternarratives About Physics on Women’s Physics Career Intentions

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions. These counternarratives facilitate making connections with students’ career plans and help in sensemaking causes for the continued minoritization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Geoff Potvin

Zahra Hazari

Raina Khatri

Hemeng Cheng

T. Blake Head

Robynne M. Lock

Anne F. Kornahrens

Kathryne Sparks Woodle

Rebecca E. Vieyra

Beth A. Cunningham

Laird Kramer

Theodore Hodapp

Year
2023
Short Description

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions.

Examining the Effect of Counternarratives About Physics on Women’s Physics Career Intentions

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions. These counternarratives facilitate making connections with students’ career plans and help in sensemaking causes for the continued minoritization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Geoff Potvin

Zahra Hazari

Raina Khatri

Hemeng Cheng

T. Blake Head

Robynne M. Lock

Anne F. Kornahrens

Kathryne Sparks Woodle

Rebecca E. Vieyra

Beth A. Cunningham

Laird Kramer

Theodore Hodapp

Year
2023
Short Description

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions.

Examining the Effect of Counternarratives About Physics on Women’s Physics Career Intentions

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions. These counternarratives facilitate making connections with students’ career plans and help in sensemaking causes for the continued minoritization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Geoff Potvin

Zahra Hazari

Raina Khatri

Hemeng Cheng

T. Blake Head

Robynne M. Lock

Anne F. Kornahrens

Kathryne Sparks Woodle

Rebecca E. Vieyra

Beth A. Cunningham

Laird Kramer

Theodore Hodapp

Year
2023
Short Description

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions.

Examining the Effect of Counternarratives About Physics on Women’s Physics Career Intentions

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions. These counternarratives facilitate making connections with students’ career plans and help in sensemaking causes for the continued minoritization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Geoff Potvin

Zahra Hazari

Raina Khatri

Hemeng Cheng

T. Blake Head

Robynne M. Lock

Anne F. Kornahrens

Kathryne Sparks Woodle

Rebecca E. Vieyra

Beth A. Cunningham

Laird Kramer

Theodore Hodapp

Year
2023
Short Description

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions.

Examining the Effect of Counternarratives About Physics on Women’s Physics Career Intentions

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions. These counternarratives facilitate making connections with students’ career plans and help in sensemaking causes for the continued minoritization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Geoff Potvin

Zahra Hazari

Raina Khatri

Hemeng Cheng

T. Blake Head

Robynne M. Lock

Anne F. Kornahrens

Kathryne Sparks Woodle

Rebecca E. Vieyra

Beth A. Cunningham

Laird Kramer

Theodore Hodapp

Year
2023
Short Description

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions.

Examining the Effect of Counternarratives About Physics on Women’s Physics Career Intentions

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions. These counternarratives facilitate making connections with students’ career plans and help in sensemaking causes for the continued minoritization of women in physics.

Author/Presenter

Geoff Potvin

Zahra Hazari

Raina Khatri

Hemeng Cheng

T. Blake Head

Robynne M. Lock

Anne F. Kornahrens

Kathryne Sparks Woodle

Rebecca E. Vieyra

Beth A. Cunningham

Laird Kramer

Theodore Hodapp

Year
2023
Short Description

Women and many people of color continue to be minoritized in STEM and notably in physics. We conducted two studies demonstrating that exposure to counternarratives about who does physics and why one does physics significantly increases high school students—especially women’s—physics-related career intentions.