Educational Technology

An Efficacy Study on the Use of Dynamic Geometry Software

Jiang, Z. & White, A. (2012). An efficacy study on the use of dynamic geometry software. In the Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Mathematical Education.

Author/Presenter: 
Zhonghong Jiang
Alexander White
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

A four-year research project funded by NSF examines the efficacy of an approach to high school geometry that utilizes dynamic geometry (DG) software and supporting instructional materials to supplement ordinary instructional practices. It compares effects of that intervention (the DG approach) with standard instruction that does not make use of computer tools. This paper reports a study conducted during the second year of the project. Student learning is assessed by a geometry test and other tests. Data for answering the research questions of the study are analyzed mainly by appropriate HLM methods. The analysis on the geometry test data is discussed in detail. The experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in geometry performance.

A Drake's Tale: Genetics Software Gets a Lift from Gaming

Author/Presenter: 
Frieda Reichsman
Trudi Lord
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

Many of us learned about dominant and recessive genes in a humdrum high school biology class. Some of us may still recognize the terms and symbols twenty or thirty years later—are your eyes bb or Bb? But, as it turns out, a very small number of traits in humans and other animals, plants, amoeba … you name it … involve the dominance mechanism of a single gene with just two alleles. (An allele is a variation of a gene, like the B or b in the above example.) The more biologists discover about the mechanisms of inheritance, the fewer traits we can point to that involve only one gene or can be illustrated using a simple Punnett square. In fact, biologists are compiling information about our genes at an astounding rate. As the process of sequencing DNA improves, the science of biology is dramatically changing.

Conclusion: Building on the Strengths of Interdisciplinarity

Author/Presenter: 
Brian R. Belland
Samuel B. Fee
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

This chapter concludes The role of criticism in understanding problem solving. In it, the overall message of the book—that criticism and critical theories can serve to aid critical reading and synthesis of the educational technology research literature—is summarized. One of the strengths of the educational technology field is its interdisciplinarity. As students enter the field from many different academic disciplines, they should be encouraged to apply not just the content of their former disciplines but also the strategies of and frameworks for thinking about problems.

The Role of Criticism in Understanding Problem Solving

  • Establishes criticism as a valuable tool for research in Educational Technology
  • Provides case studies to fully explain the role for criticism in PBL research
  • Proposes a fresh new approach to solve complex research questions within Educational Technology
  • Introduces a new method for data analysis and analysis of research results in PBL
Author/Presenter: 
Samuel B. Fee
Brian Belland
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

The concept of criticism as a tool for research, although well established in other educational research traditions, is not well established in the domain of Educational Technology. This book changes all that by substantiating criticism as a way to step back and critically evaluate an educational intervention within educational technology. Doing so provides an valuable approach for researchers in terms of guiding meta analyses and theoretical studies, preventing the proverbial "spinning of the wheels" that often happens in educational research.

Using Teaching Routines with Classroom Network Technology to Support Improved Classroom Assessment (Penuel, Schank)

Author/Presenter: 
William Penuel
Patricia Schank
Year: 
2009
Short Description: 

This interactive workshop introduces participants to teaching routines for use with a classroom network technology called Group Scribbles, which supports teachers’ invention of classroom assessment activities in Earth science.

The Evidence Games - Poster Session 2010

Since an August 2010 start date, the Evidence Game team has been engaged in an iterative design and development process for a game to provide middle school students and their teachers with practice in Toulmin’s (1984) model of argumentation as applied to science.  The poster session will present the overall conceptual model for a targeted game to provide practice in argumentation and efforts to make this process a fun experience for youth.

Author/Presenter: 
Janis Bulgren
Marilyn Ault
Jim Ellis
Bruce Frey
Jana Craig Hare
Year: 
2010

Situated assessment using virtual environments for science content and inquiry (Ketelhut, Nelson, Schifter)

Author/Presenter: 
Diane Ketelhut
Brian Nelson
Catherine Schifter
Year: 
2009
Short Description: 

In this session, the presenters discuss findings and experiences regarding technology-embedded assessment and how to support teachers in using it effectively.

Research on Student Understanding of Data Organization

Author/Presenter: 
Cliff Konold
Vishakha Parvate
William Finzer
Year: 
2010
Short Description: 

As part of the Data Games project, we are researching how students record and organize multivariate data. This research is informing the design of new software interfaces for Fathom and TinkerPlots that will allow students to explore and understand data that live in other than "flat" data structures — the structures that most software tools currently limit themselves to.
We have designed the Traffic Problem to explore the following questions:
1. What methods do novices and experts use to sytematically record data with multiple attributes?
2. In recording data, do students employ a recognizable notion of “case?"

Designing Powerful Digital Environments for Professional Development (Fosnot)

Author/Presenter: 
Catherine Fosnot
Year: 
2009
Short Description: 

Professional development environments that include digital video allow for the examination of children at work, opportunities to look at students over time, and analysis of the teacher’s decision making. This observation begs the question of how best to shape mathematics education courses that build on the use of digital environments. This session examines some possibilities for developing both content and pedagogical knowledge.

Pages

Subscribe to Educational Technology