Gaming/Virtual Environments

Exploring African American Middle-School Girls' Perceptions of Themselves as Game Designers

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) is a longitudinal project that explores the development of CAT capabilities by guiding African American middle-school girls through the iterative game design cycle, resulting in a set of complex games around broad themes.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita O. Thomas
Rachelle Minor
O. Carlette Odemwingie
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

This paper explores African American middle-school girls' perspectives of their experience with the Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) project and perceptions of themselves as game designers.

Exploring the Difficulties African-American Middle School Girls Face Enacting Computational Algorithmic Thinking over three Years while Designing Games for Social Change

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. It involves identifying and understanding a problem, articulating an algorithm or set of algorithms in the form of a solution to the problem, implementing that solution in such a way that the solution solves the problem, and evaluating the solution based on some set of criteria.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita O. Thomas
Yolanda Rankin
Rachelle Minor
Li Sun
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

This article explores middle school girls' reflections about the difficulties they faced while using computational algorithmic thinking capabilities as they engaged in collaborative game design for social change. Authors focus on how these difficulties changed over the course of three years as well as new difficulties that emerged from year to year as girls become more expert game designers and computational algorithmic thinkers.

Understanding the Difficulties African-American Middle School Girls Face While Enacting Computational Algorithmic Thinking in the Context of Game Design

Computational algorithmic thinking (CAT) is the ability to design, implement, and assess the implementation of algorithms to solve a range of problems. It involves identifying and understanding a problem, articulating an algorithm or set of algorithms in the form of a solution to the problem, implementing that solution in such a way that it solves the problem, and evaluating the solution based on some set of criteria. CAT has roots in Mathematics, through problem solving and algorithmic thinking. CAT lies at the heart of Computer Science, which is defined as the study of algorithms.

Author/Presenter: 
Jakita O. Thomas
O. Carlette Odemwingie
Quimeka Saunders
Malika Watlerd
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 

This article introduces CAT as explored through the Supporting Computational Algorithmic Thinking (SCAT) project, an ongoing longitudinal between-subjects research project and enrichment program that guides African-American middle school girls (SCAT Scholars) through the iterative game design cycle resulting in a set of complex games around broad themes.

Game-Based Learning Assessments: Using Data from Digital Games to Understand Learning

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Discover how digital games can inform classroom teaching using data from innovative formative assessments from three different game-based projects.

Date/Time: 
9:30 am to 11:00 am
Session Materials: 

This session aims to open up a conversation about of how games can be used for formative assessment and how data from digital games can inform classroom teaching.

Session Types: 

Data-Intensive Research in Education: New Opportunities for Making an Impact

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Join a facilitated discussion about the application of data science to education, drawing on a recent NSF-sponsored report. Participants share insights from DR K–12 projects.

Date/Time: 
9:30 am to 11:00 am
Session Materials: 

The Computing Research Association’s report from an NSF-sponsored workshop describes seven next steps for data-intensive research in education:

Session Types: 

Constructing and Role-Playing Student Avatars in a Simulation of Teaching Algebra for Diverse Learners

From the perspectives of Graduate Research Assistants (GRAs), this study examines the design and implementation of a simulated teaching environment in Second Life (SL) for prospective teachers to teach algebra for diverse learners. Drawing upon the Learning-for-Use framework, the analyses provide evidence on the development of student avatars in construction and role-playing activities. The study reveals challenges, procedures, and suggestions for future simulations. This study also calls for research efforts toward preparing mathematics teachers for cultural diversity.

Author/Presenter: 
Tingting Ma
Irving A. Brown
Gerald Kulm
Trina J. Davis
Chance W. Lewis
G. Donald Allen
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 

This study examines the design and implementation of a simulated teaching environment in Second Life for prospective teachers.

The effectiveness of Reason Racer, a game designed to engage middle school students in scientific argumentation

Reason Racer is an online, rate-based, multiplayer game that applies specific game features in
order to engage middle school students in introductory knowledge of and thinking related to
scientific argumentation. Game features include rapid and competitive play, timed performance,
immediate feedback, and high rates of response across many game-play sessions and science
scenarios. The areas of argumentation addressed in the game include understanding a claim,
judging evidence about a claim based on type (fact, opinion) and quality, determining the

Author/Presenter: 
Marilyn Ault
Jana Craig-Hare
Bruce Frey
James D. Ellis
Janis Bulgren
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2015

How games can engage students and improve learning

Ault, M., (2014). How games can engage students and improve learning. eSchool News: Daily Tech News & Innovation. Retrieved from www.eschoolnews.com/2014/06/06/games-engage-students-241/

Author/Presenter: 
Marilyn Ault
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 

Understanding how games create a sense of flow and engagement can help teachers make better choices about their instructional use of games.

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