Discourse

Gathering Response Process Data for a Problem-Solving Measure through Whole-Class Think Alouds

Response process validity evidence provides a window into a respondent’s cognitive processing. The purpose of this study is to describe a new data collection tool called a whole-class think aloud (WCTA). This work is performed as part of test development for a series of problem-solving measures to be used in elementary and middle grades. Data from third-grade students were collected in a 1–1 think-aloud setting and compared to data from similar students as part of WCTAs. Findings indicated that students performed similarly on the items when the two think-aloud settings were compared.

Author/Presenter: 
Jonathan David Bostic
Toni A. Sondergeld
Gabriel Matney
Gregory Stone
Tiara Hicks
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2021
Short Description: 

This is a description of a new methodological tool to gather response process validity evidence. The context is scholarship within mathematics education contexts.

An Examination of Credit Recovery Students’ Use of Computer-Based Scaffolding in a Problem-Based, Scientific Inquiry Unit

In this study, we investigated how high school credit recovery students worked in small groups and used computer-based scaffolds to conduct scientific inquiry in a problem-based learning unit centered on water quality. We examined how students searched for and evaluated information from different sources, and used evidence to support their claims. Data sources included screen recordings, interviews, scaffold trace data, and scaffold entry quality ratings. Findings indicate that many students struggled to use the scaffolding and did not fully respond to scaffold prompts.

Author/Presenter: 
Brian R. Belland
D. Mark Weiss
Nam Ju Kim
Jacob Piland
Jiangyue Gu
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

In this study, we investigated how high school credit recovery students worked in small groups and used computer-based scaffolds to conduct scientific inquiry in a problem-based learning unit centered on water quality.

Supporting Sense-making with Mathematical Bet Lines

This article presents an instructional strategy called Mathematical Bet Lines that was designed to promote classroom discourse and sense-making for all students, in particular English Language Learners.  Introduced in Project AIM (All Included in Mathematics), a 40 hour professional development program focused promoting meaningful mathematical discourse, the Mathematical Bet Lines strategy supports comprehension of story problems by having students articulate to themselves and others their predictions regarding what is happening in the problem as it is revealed one sentence at a time.  With

Author/Presenter: 
Lara Dick
Tracy Foote White
Aaron Trocki
Paola Sztajn
Daniel Heck
Kate Herrema
Year: 
2016
Short Description: 

This article presents an instructional strategy called Mathematical Bet Lines that was designed to promote classroom discourse and sense-making for all students, in particular English Language Learners.

Resource(s): 

Launching a Discourse-rich Mathematics Lesson

Facilitating meaningful mathematical discourse is dependent on the launch of the lesson where teachers prepare their students to work on the task.

Author/Presenter: 
Aaron Trocki
Christine Taylor
Tina Starling
Paola Sztajn
Daniel Heck
Year: 
2015
Short Description: 

This article discusses the use of the Think Aloud strategy at the beginning of a lesson to model to students both the type of thinking that develops conceptual understanding, as well as how to share one’s thinking.

Mathematical Argumentation in Middle School—The What, Why, and How

Get them talking: Your formula for bringing math concepts to life!

Author/Presenter: 
Jennifer Knudsen
Harriette Stevens
Teresa Lara-Meloy
Hee-Joon Kim
Nicole Shechtman
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

This guide delivers all the tools you need to get serious about mathematical argumentation and bring well-planned, well-constructed mathematical discourse to life in your classroom.

A synthesis of mathematics writing: Assessments, interventions, and surveys

Mathematics standards in the United States describe communication as an essential part of mathematics. One outlet for communication is writing. To understand the mathematics writing of students, we conducted a synthesis to evaluate empirical research about mathematics writing. We identified 29 studies that included a mathematics-writing assessment, intervention, or survey for students in 1st through 12th grade. All studies were published between 1991 and 2015.

Author/Presenter: 
Sarah Powell
Michael Hebert
Jeremy Cohen
Tutita Casa
Janine Firmender
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

To understand the mathematics writing of students, we conducted a synthesis to evaluate empirical research about mathematics writing. We identified 29 studies that included a mathematics-writing assessment, intervention, or survey for students in 1st through 12th grade. All studies were published between 1991 and 2015.

The Leaders Handbook for the Practicum Academy to Improve Science Education (PRACTISE)

This handbook provides detailed information on how to conduct a series of research-based professional learning sessions focused on helping elementary classroom teachers to facilitate science argumentation with their students. Each session is 2-3 hours long and focuses on topics such as:

Author/Presenter: 
Emily Weiss
Craig Strang
Year: 
2017
Short Description: 

The Practicum Academy to Improve Science Education (PRACTISE) is a professional learning program to support scientific argumentation in grades 3-5. This handbook provides detailed information on how to conduct a series of research-based professional learning sessions focused on helping elementary classroom teachers to facilitate science argumentation with their students.

Teachers Extending Their Knowledge in Online Collaborative Learning Environments: Opportunities and Challenges

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Fri

Join two projects to discuss the challenges and opportunities afforded through online environments for providing professional development and supporting classroom implementation of mathematical practices.

Date/Time: 
9:15 am to 10:45 am
Session Materials: 

Teams of researchers from Drexel University, Rutgers University, University of Missouri, and the Math Forum have been investigating online environments for math education and math teacher professional learning communities. The Virtual Math Teams project has developed a synchronous, multi-user GeoGebra implementation and studies the learning of small groups as well as the preparation of teachers to facilitate this learning.

Session Types: 

Preparing Teachers to Support Rich Disciplinary Discussions in Their Classrooms

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Learn about pre- or in-service teacher education activities designed to support teacher facilitation of student disciplinary discussions through enactments that illustrate teacher education activities.

Date/Time: 
2:15 pm to 3:45 pm
Session Materials: 

Often the most we know about our colleagues’ on-the-ground support of teachers is what we read in the methods sections of research articles, or what has been reified many times over in their published teacher learning materials. We rarely get to see, much less experience, one another’s approaches to supporting teachers. This session will open up the black-box of our work with teachers for discussion and scrutiny.

Session Types: 

Elementary Mathematical Writing Task Force Recommendations: Implications for Research and Classroom Implementation

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Learn about types of and purposes for elementary mathematical writing, and discuss implications for research and classroom implementation.

Date/Time: 
9:30 am to 11:00 am
Session Materials: 

Although the mathematics education community long has emphasized the importance of discourse in teaching and learning mathematics, mathematical writing has not been clearly defined. Questions remain about how writing can leverage elementary students’ learning of mathematics. In October 2015, the Elementary Mathematical Writing Task Force came together and recommended four types of writing (exploratory, informative/explanatory, argumentative, and mathematically creative) and their respective purposes.

Session Types: 

Pages

Subscribe to Discourse