Undergraduate

STEM Smart Brief: Connecting Informal and Formal STEM Education

Author/Presenter: 
CADRE
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

“Providing a richness of resources unavailable in any classroom, informal science institutions across the country have developed exemplary partnerships with public schools—and have room for more.” Read this brief to explore how out-of-school learning can complement and enhance what is being taught in the classroom.

STEM Smart Brief: Raising the Bar: Increasing STEM Achievement for All Students

Author/Presenter: 
CADRE
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

“When students from non-mainstream backgrounds receive equitable learning opportunities, they are capable of attaining science outcomes comparable to their mainstream peers. The same is true for mathematics and, presumably, for other STEM subjects, as well.” Read this brief to dive further into what can be done to improve the academic achievement of students from all backgrounds.

STEM Smart Brief: Improving STEM Curriculum and Instruction: Engaging Students and Raising Standards

Author/Presenter: 
CADRE
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

“For effective K–12 STEM instruction to become the norm, schools and districts must be transformed.” Read this brief to learn more about curriculum and instructional methods that engage students in the learning process.

STEM Smart Brief: Preparing and Supporting STEM Educators

Author/Presenter: 
CADRE
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

“Recent research emphasizes that teacher quality alone cannot improve student achievement at scale. School leadership, staff collaboration, and a positive climate are among essential organizational elements that contribute to meaningful change.” Read this brief to learn more about suggested methods for properly supporting STEM educators.

Preparing Students for College and Careers in STEM

“The majority of U.S. students, particularly low-income and minority youth, lacks foundational skills and knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.” Read this STEM Smart brief to find out more about the efforts that are making change across the nation.

Author/Presenter: 
CADRE
Year: 
2013
Short Description: 

“The majority of U.S. students, particularly low-income and minority youth, lacks foundational skills and knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.” Read this STEM Smart brief to find out more about the efforts that are making change across the nation.

Descriptive Overview of the DR K-12 Portfolio: Projects funded 2007-2012

The Discovery Research K-12 (DR K-12) program, funded by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL), supports research and development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Specifically, the program seeks to enhance the learning and teaching of STEM by funding “research projects that study the development, testing, deployment, effectiveness, and/or scale-up of innovative resources, models and tools.”

Author/Presenter: 
Alina Martinez
Brian Freeman
Daphne Minner
Laurie Bozzi
Caroline Callahan
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2013
Short Description: 

This report, the fifth and final portfolio overview to be prepared by CADRE, describes important characteristics of the first six cohorts of DR K-12 projects that received their initial funding from 2007 to 2012. It characterizes the development and research in STEM education—on resources, models, and technologies—funded by the DR K-12 program.

VISUALIZING OCEANS OF DATA Educational Interface Design

Science is data-intensive, but today’s science education is not. In most classrooms, students’ work with data is limited to reading graphs prepared by others, or at best collecting simple data sets themselves. While these student-collected data sets allow students to begin building their data proficiency, the conclusions that can be drawn and the lessons that can be learned from these data are limited in scope and can sometimes be compromised by data quality.

Author/Presenter: 
Ruth Krumhansl
Cheryl Peach
June Foster
Amy Busey
Irene Baker
Jackie DeLisi
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

The Oceans of Data project has made an attempt to define and confront what is “hard” for students and teachers who attempt to use large, online professional data sets. We feel passionately that it’s important for us to do this to prepare today’s students for tomorrow’s world.

Foregrounding Equity in Mathematics Teacher Education

Author/Presenter: 
Marilyn Strutchens
Jennifer Bay-Williams
Marta Civil
Kathryn Chval
Carol E. Malloy
Dorothy Y. White
Beatriz D’Ambrosio
Robert Q. Berry III
Year: 
2011
Short Description: 

Equity in mathematics education should be one of the most important concerns of
teachers, administrators, policy makers, mathematicians, and mathematics educators. In fact, the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educator (AMTE), the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM), and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics NCTM), three national organizations that support teacher educators, mathematics teachers, and teacher leaders, have made equity a priority for their organizations (Gutierrez et al. 2008). Position statements, standards documents, and various books identify key equity issues and recommend directions compelling all involved in the mathematics education of students to become aware of equity issues and to take steps toward eliminating the inequities that plague K-16 education.

Conserving Energy in Physics and Society: Creating an Integrated Model of Energy and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

Author/Presenter: 
Abigail R. Daane
Stamatis Vokos
Rachel E. Scherr
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 

The second law of thermodynamics is typically not a central focus either in introductory university physics textbooks or in national standards for secondary education. However, the second law is a key part of a strong conceptual model of energy, especially for connecting energy conservation to energy degradation and the irreversibility of processes. We are developing a conceptual model of the second law as it relates to energy, with the goal of creating models and representations that link energy, the second law, and entropy in a meaningful way for learners analyzing real-life energy scenarios. We expect this model to help learners better understand how their everyday experiences relate to formal physics analyses. Our goal is to develop tools for use with elementary and secondary teachers and secondary and university students.

Preparation and Characterization of a Polymeric Monolithic Column for Use in High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)

Author/Presenter: 
Michael P. Bindis
Stacey Lowery Bretz
Neil D. Danielson
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2011
Short Description: 

The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiment, most often done in the undergraduate analytical instrumentation laboratory course, generally illustrates reversed-phase chromatography using a commercial C18 silica column. To avoid the expense of periodic column replacement and introduce a choice of columns with different stationary phases, we have developed an experiment in which students prepare and test a polymer-based monolithic column. The 10 or 15 cm monolithic column is prepared using 1/8 in. o.d. × 2.3 mm i.d. poly(ether ether ketone) or PEEK tubing. The reaction is accomplished thermally at 60 °C for several hours by polymerization of butyl methacrylate cross-linked with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in a porogen system consisting of 1,4-butanediol, 1-propanol, and water. Using toluene and naphthalene as analytes, profiles of retention factor as a function of methanol have been shown. A study of essential nutrients can be accomplished by using an ion-pairing reagent to separate thiamine from riboflavin. In addition, plate count and van Deemter plots can be done to determine column efficiency. The experiment can be designed to be completed over a 1 to 3 week period of time. Exposure to polymer chemistry, often not a part of the undergraduate laboratory curriculum, is an additional important aspect of this experiment.

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