Cognitive Science

PBS NewsHour STEM Student Reporting Labs: Broad Expansion of Youth Journalism to Support Increased STEM Literacy Among Underserved Student Populations and Their Communities

The production of news stories and student-oriented instruction in the classroom are designed to increase student learning of STEM content through student-centered inquiry and reflections on metacognition. This project scales up the PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs (SRL), a model that trains teens to produce video reports on important STEM issues from a youth perspective.

Award Number: 
1503315
Funding Period: 
Sat, 08/01/2015 to Wed, 07/31/2019
Full Description: 

The Discovery Research K-12 program (DR-K12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools (RMTs). Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. This project scales up the PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs (SRL), a model that trains teens to produce video reports on important STEM issues from a youth perspective. Participating schools receive a SRL journalism and digital media literacy curriculum, a mentor for students from a local PBS affiliate, professional development for educators, and support from the PBS NewsHour team. The production of news stories and student-oriented instruction in the classroom are designed to increase student learning of STEM content through student-centered inquiry and reflections on metacognition. Students will develop a deep understanding of the material to choose the best strategy to teach or tell the STEM story to others through digital media. Over the 4 years of the project, the model will be expanded from the current 70 schools to 150 in 40 states targeting schools with high populations of underrepresented youth. New components will be added to the model including STEM professional mentors and a social media and media analytics component. Project partners include local PBS stations, Project Lead the Way, and Share My Lesson educators.

The research study conducted by New Knowledge, LLC will add new knowledge about the growing field of youth science journalism and digital media. Front-end evaluation will assess students' understanding of contemporary STEM issues by deploying a web-based survey to crowd-source youth reactions, interest, questions, and thoughts about current science issues. A subset of questions will explore students' tendencies to pass newly-acquired information to members of the larger social networks. Formative evaluation will include qualitative and quantitative studies of multiple stakeholders at the Student Reporting Labs to refine the implementation of the program. Summative evaluation will track learning outcomes/changes such as: How does student reporting on STEM news increase their STEM literacy competencies? How does it affect their interest in STEM careers? Which strategies are most effective with underrepresented students? How do youth communicate with each other about science content, informing news media best practices? The research team will use data from pre/post and post-delayed surveys taken by 1700 students in the STEM Student Reporting Labs and 1700 from control groups. In addition, interviews with teachers will assess the curriculum and impressions of student engagement.


Project Videos

2019 STEM for All Video Showcase

Title: How Video Storytelling Reengages Teenagers in STEM Learning

Presenter(s): Leah Clapman & William Swift

2018 STEM for All Video Showcase

Title: PBS NewsHour's STEM SRL Transforms Classrooms into Newsrooms

Presenter(s): Leah Clapman & William Swift

2017 STEM for All Video Showcase

Title: PBS is Building the Next Generation of STEM Communicators

Presenter(s): Leah Clapman, John Fraser, Su-Jen Roberts, & Bill Swift


Fostering STEM Trajectories: Bridging ECE Research, Practice, and Policy

This project will convene stakeholders in STEM and early childhood education to discuss better integration of STEM in the early grades. PIs will begin with a phase of background research to surface critical issues in teaching and learning in early childhood education and STEM.  A number of reports will be produced including commissioned papers, vision papers, and a forum synthesis report.

Lead Organization(s): 
Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1417878
Funding Period: 
Mon, 06/15/2015 to Tue, 05/31/2016
Full Description: 

Early childhood education is at the forefront of the minds of parents, teachers, policymakers as well as the general public. A strong early childhood foundation is critical for lifelong learning. The National Science Foundation has made a number of early childhood grants in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) over the years and the knowledge generated from this work has benefitted researchers. Early childhood teachers and administrators, however, have little awareness of this knowledge since there is little research that is translated and disseminated into practice, according to the National Research Council. In addition, policies for both STEM and early childhood education has shifted in the last decade. 

The Joan Ganz Cooney Center and the New America Foundation are working together to highlight early childhood STEM education initiatives. Specifically, the PIs will convene stakeholders in STEM and early childhood education to discuss better integration of STEM in the early grades. PIs will begin with a phase of background research to surface critical issues in teaching and learning in early childhood education and STEM. The papers will be used as anchor topics to organize a forum with a broad range of stakeholders including policymakers as well as early childhood researchers and practitioners. A number of reports will be produced including commissioned papers, vision papers, and a forum synthesis report. The synthesis report will be widely disseminated by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center and the New America Foundation.

The Discovery Research K-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools (RMTs). Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed project.

CAREER: Leveraging Contrasting Cases to Investigate Integer Understanding

Most students learn about negative numbers long after they have learned about positive numbers, and they have little time or opportunity to build on their prior understanding by contrasting the two concepts. The purpose of this CAREER project is to identify language factors and instructional sequences that contribute to improving elementary students' understanding of addition and subtraction problems involving negative integers. 

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1350281
Funding Period: 
Thu, 05/15/2014 to Tue, 04/30/2019
Full Description: 

Currently, most students learn about negative numbers long after they have learned about positive numbers, and they have little time or opportunity to build on their prior understanding by contrasting the two concepts. Therefore, they struggle to make sense of negative integer concepts, which appear to conflict with their current understanding. The purpose of this CAREER project is to identify language factors and instructional sequences that contribute to improving elementary students' understanding of addition and subtraction problems involving negative integers. A second objective is to identify how elementary teachers interpret their students' integer understanding and use research findings to support their teaching of these concepts. This project is expected to contribute to theories regarding the development of integer understanding as well as what makes a useful contrasting case when learning new, related concepts. Moreover, the results of this project can contribute to our understanding of how to build on students? prior number knowledge rather than contradict it.

The principal investigator will conduct a series of four experimental studies involving a preparation for learning component with students randomly assigned to treatment or control groups. Study 1 will involve second and fourth graders and will test the language factors that support students' understanding of integers. Studies 2-4 will involve second and fifth graders and will test the optimal order in which integer addition and subtraction problems are presented in contrast with each other versus sequentially without contrasts. Using items that measure students? understanding of integers and integer operations, the PI will compare students' gains from pre-tests to post-tests between groups. Further, the investigator will qualitatively code students? solution strategies based on follow-up interviews and written work for additional information on the differences between groups. Following the experimental studies, the PI will work with elementary teachers over three lesson study cycles, during which teachers will implement instruction based on the prior studies? results. The PI will compare the performance of students who participate in the lesson study unit versus control classrooms to measure impact of the unit.

Videos of the lesson study unit, as well as the negative integer lesson plans will be made available for other teachers and teacher educators to use. Further, the investigator will incorporate the research results into an undergraduate mathematics methods course. To ensure that the results of this research reach a wider audience, the investigator will create an integer game and storybook, illustrating key concepts identified through the research, that parents can explore together with their children during family math nights and at home. On a broader scale, this project has the potential to illuminate ways to develop more coherence in the sequencing of mathematics topics to more effectively build on students? current understanding.

CAREER: Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

The goal of this CAREER program of research is to identify, from a cross-cultural perspective, essential Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching (AKT) that will enable elementary teachers to better develop students' algebraic thinking. This study explores AKT based on integrated insights of the U.S. and Chinese expert teachers' classroom performance.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1350068
Funding Period: 
Fri, 08/15/2014 to Wed, 07/31/2019
Full Description: 

What content knowledge is needed for the teaching of mathematics? What practices are more effective for realizing student success? These questions have received considerable attention in the mathematics education community. The goal of this CAREER program of research is to identify, from a cross-cultural perspective, essential Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching (AKT) that will enable elementary teachers to better develop students' algebraic thinking. Focusing on two fundamental mathematical ideas recently emphasized by the Common Core State Standards - inverse relations and properties of operations - this study explores AKT based on integrated insights of the U.S. and Chinese expert teachers' classroom performance. It will be focused on three objectives: (1) identify AKT that facilitates algebraic thinking and develop preliminary findings into teaching materials; (2) refine research-based teaching materials based on the evaluative data; and (3) integrate research with education through course development at Temple University and teacher outreach in Philadelphia.

The model underlying this research program is that improved pedagogy will improve student learning, both directly and indirectly. A design-based research method will be used to accomplish objectives #1 and #2. Cross-cultural videotaped lessons will be first analyzed to identify AKT, focusing on teachers' use of worked examples, representations, and deep questions. This initial set of findings will then be developed into teaching materials. The U.S. and Chinese expert teachers will re-teach the lessons as part of the refinement process. Data sources will include: baseline and updated survey data (control, context, and process variables), observation, documents, videos, and interviews. The statistical techniques will include descriptive and inferential statistics and HLM will to address the hierarchical nature of the data.

This project involves students and teachers at various levels (elementary, undergraduate, and graduate) at Temple University and the School District of Philadelphia (SDP) in the U.S. and Nanjing Normal University and Nantong School District in China. A total of 600 current and future elementary teachers and many of their students will benefit directly or indirectly from this project. Project findings will be disseminated through various venues. Activities of the project will promote school district-university collaboration, a novice-expert teacher network, and cross-disciplinary and international collaboration. It is anticipated that the videos of expert teaching will also be useful future research by cognitive researchers studying ways to improve mathematics learning.

Publications
G indicates graduate student author; U indicates undergraduate student author

Journal Articles in English

  1. Ding, M., G Chen, W., & G Hassler, R. (2019). Linear quantity models in the US and Chinese elementary mathematics classrooms. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 21, 105-130 doi: 10.1080/10986065.2019.1570834 . PDF
  2. Barnett, E., & Ding, M. (2019). Teaching of the associative property: A natural classroom investigation. Investigations of Mathematics Learning, 11, 148-166. doi: 10.1080/19477503.2018.1425592  PDF
  3. Ding, M., & G Heffernan, K. (2018). Transferring specialized content knowledge to elementary classrooms: Preservice teachers’ learning to teach the associative property. International Journal of Mathematics Educational in Science and Technology, 49, 899-921.doi: 10.1080/0020739X.2018.1426793 PDF
  4. Ding, M. (2018). Modeling with tape diagrams. Teaching Children Mathematics25, 158-165. doi: 10.5951/teacchilmath.25.3.0158  PDF
  5. G Chen, W., & Ding, M.* (2018). Transitioning from mathematics textbook to classroom instruction: The case of a Chinese expert teacher. Frontiers of Education in China, 13, 601-632. doi: 10.1007/s11516-018-0031-z (*Both authors contributed equally). PDF
  6. Ding, M., & G Auxter, A. (2017). Children’s strategies to solving additive inverse problems: A preliminary analysis. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 29, 73-92. doi:10.1007/s13394-017-0188-4  PDF
  7. Ding, M. (2016).  Developing preservice elementary teachers’ specialized content knowledge for teaching fundamental mathematical ideas: The case of associative property. International Journal of STEM Education, 3(9), 1-19doi: 10.1186/s40594-016-0041-4  PDF
  8. Ding, M. (2016). Opportunities to learn: Inverse operations in U.S. and Chinese elementary mathematics textbooks. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 18, 45-68. doi: 10.1080/10986065.2016.1107819  PDF

Journal Articles in Chinese
Note: The Chinese journals Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction教育研究与评论 (小学教育教学) and Curriculum and Instructional Methods (课程教材教法) are both official, core journals in mathematics education field in China.

  1. Chen, W. (2018). Strategies to deal with mathematical representations – an analysis of expert’s classroom instruction. Curriculum and Instructional Methods. 数学教学的表征处理策略——基于专家教师的课堂教学分析. 课程教材教法. PDF
  2. Ma, F. ( 2018) – Necessary algebraic knowledge for elementary teachers- an ongoing cross-cultural study. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 5-7.  小学教师必备的代数学科知识-跨文化研究进行时。教育研究与评论 (小学教育教学), 2, 5-7. PDF
  3. Chen, J. (2018) Infusion and development of children’s early algebraic thinking – a comparative study of the US and Chinese elementary mathematics teaching. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 8-13.  儿童早期代数思维的渗透与培养-中美小学数学教学比较研究。教育研究与评论(小学教育教学),28-13.  PDF
  4. Zong, L. (2018). A comparative study on the infusion of inverse relations in the US and Chinese classroom teaching. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 14-19.  中美逆运算渗透教学对比研究。教育研究与评论(小学教育教学,2,14-19.  PDF
  5. Wu, X. (2018). Mathematical representations and development of children’s mathematical thinking: A perspective of US-Chinese comparison. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 20-24.  数学表征与儿童数学思维发展-基于中美比较视角。教育研究与评论(小学教育教学,2, 20-24.  PDF

Dissertations

  1. Hassler, R. (2016). Mathematical comprehension facilitated by situation models: Learning opportunities for inverse relations in elementary school.Published dissertation, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. (Chair: Dr. Meixia Ding)  PDF
  2. Chen, W. (2018). Elementary mathematics teachers’ professional growth: A perspectives of TPACK (TPACK 视角下小学数学教师专业发展的研究). Dissertation, Nanjing Normal University. Nanjing, China. PDF

National Presentations
G indicates graduate student author; U indicates undergraduate student author

  • Ding, M (symposium organizer, 2019, April). Enhancing elementary mathematics instruction: A U.S.-China collaboration. Papers presented at NCTM research conference (Discussant: Jinfa Cai). (The following three action research papers were written by my NSF project teachers under my guidance).
      • Milewski Moskal, M., & Varano, A. (2019). The teaching of worked examples: Chinese approaches in U.S. classrooms. Paper 
      • Larese, T., Milewski Moskal, M., Ottinger, M., & Varano, A., (2019). Introducing Investigations math games in China: Successes and surprises. Paper
      • Murray, D., Seidman, J., Blackmon, E., Maimon, G., & Domsky, A. (2019). Mathematic instruction across two cultures: A teacher perspective. Paper
    • Ding, M., & Ying Y. (2018, June). CAREER: Algebraic knowledge for teaching: A cross-cultural perspective. Poster presentation at the National Science Foundation (NSF) PI meeting, Washington, DC.  Poster
    • Ding, M., Brynes, J., G Barnett, E., & Hassler, R. (2018, April). When classroom instruction predicts students’ learning of early algebra: A cross-cultural opportunity-propensity analysis. Paper presented at 2018 AERA conference. New York, NY.  Paper
    • Ding, M., Li, X., Manfredonia, M., & Luo, W. (2018, April). Video as a tool to support teacher learning: A Cross-cultural analysis. Paper presented at 2018 NCTM conference. Washington, DC.  PPT
    • GBarnett, E., & Ding, M. (2018, April). Teaching the basic properties of arithmetic: A natural classroom investigation of associativity. Poster presentation at 2018AERA conference, New York, NY.  Poster
    • Hassler, R., & Ding, M. (2018, April). The role of deep questions in promoting elementary students’ mathematical comprehension. Poster presentation at 2018AERA conference, New York, NY.
    • Ding, M., G Chen, W., G Hassler, R., Li, X., & G Barnett, E. (April, 2017). Comparisons in the US and Chinese elementary mathematics classrooms. Poster presentation at AERA 2017 conference (In the session of “Advancing Mathematics Education Through NSF’s DRK-12 Program”). San Antonio, TX. Poster
    • Ding, M., Li, X., G Hassler, R., & G Barnett, E. (April, 2017). Understanding the basic properties of operations in US and Chinese elementary School. Paper presented at AERA 2017 conference. San Antonio, TX.  Paper
    • Ding, M., G Chen, W., & G Hassler, R. (April, 2017). Tape diagrams in the US and Chinese elementary mathematics classrooms. Paper presented at NCTM 2017 conference. San Antonio, TX.  Paper
    • Ding, M., & G Hassler, R. (2016, June). CAREER: Algebraic knowledge for teaching in elementary school: A cross-cultural perspective. Poster presentation at the NSF PI meeting, Washington, DC. Poster
    • Ding, M. (symposium organizer, 2016, April). Early algebraic in elementary school: A cross-cultural perspective. Proposals presented at 2016 AERA conference, Washington, DC.
        • Ding, M. (2016, April). A comparative analysis of inverse operations in U.S. and Chinese elementary mathematics textbooks. Paper 
        • G Hassler, R. (2016, April). Elementary Textbooks to Classroom Teaching: A Situation Model Perspective. Paper
        • G Chen, W., & Ding, M. (2016, April). Transitioning textbooks into classroom teaching: An action research on Chinese elementary mathematics lessons. Paper
        • Li, X., G Hassler, R., & Ding, M. (2016, April). Elementary students’ understanding of inverse relations in the U.S. and China.  Paper
        • Stull, J., Ding, M., G Hassler, R., Li, X., & U George, C. (2016, April). The impact of algebraic knowledge for teaching on student learning: A Preliminary analysis. Paper
      • Ding, M., G Hassler, R., Li., X., & G Chen, W. (2016, April). Algebraic knowledge for teaching: An analysis of US experts' lessons on inverse relations. Paper presented at 2016 NCTM conference, San Francisco, CA. Paper
      • G Hassler. R., & Ding, M. (2016, April). Situation model perspective on mathematics classroom teaching: A case study on inverse relations. Paper presented at 2016 NCTM conference, San Francisco, CA.  Paper
      • Ding, M., & G Copeland, K. (2015, April). Transforming specialized content knowledge: Preservice elementary teachers’ learning to teach the associative property of multiplication. Paper presented at AERA 2015 conference, Chicago, IL. Paper PPT
      • Ding, M., & G Auxter, A. (2015, April). Children’s strategies to solving additive inverse problems: A preliminary analysis. Paper presented at AERA 2015 conference, Chicago, IL.  Paper

      Learning about Ecosystems Science and Complex Causality through Experimentation in a Virtual World

      This project will develop a modified virtual world and accompanying curriculum for middle school students to help them learn to more deeply understand ecosystems patterns and the strengths and limitations of experimentation in ecosystems science. The project will build upon a computer world called EcoMUVE, a Multi-User Virtual Environment or MUVE, and will develop ways for students to conduct experiments within the virtual world and to see the results of those experiments.

      Project Email: 
      Lead Organization(s): 
      Award Number: 
      1416781
      Funding Period: 
      Mon, 09/01/2014 to Thu, 08/31/2017
      Full Description: 

      EcoXPT from videohall.com on Vimeo.

      Comprehending how ecosystems function is important knowledge for citizens in making decisions and for students who aspire to become scientists. This understanding requires deep thinking about complex causality, unintended side-effects, and the strengths and limitations of experimental science. These are difficult concepts to learn due to the many interacting components and non-linear interrelationships involved. Ecosystems dynamics is particularly difficult to teach in classrooms because ecosystems involve complexities such as phenomena distributed widely across space that change over long time frames. Learning when and how experimental science can provide useful information in understanding ecosystems dynamics requires moving beyond the limited affordances of classrooms. The project will: 1) advance understanding of experimentation in ecosystems as it can be applied to education; 2) show how student learning is affected by having opportunities to experiment in the virtual world that simulate what scientists do in the real world and with models; and 3) produce results comparing this form of teaching to earlier instructional approaches. This project will result in a learning environment that will support learning about the complexities of the earth's ecosystem.

      The project will build upon a computer world called EcoMUVE, a Multi-User Virtual Environment or MUVE, developed as part of an earlier NSF-funded project. A MUVE is a simulated world in which students can virtually walk around, make observations, talk to others, and collect data. EcoMUVE simulates a pond and a forest ecosystem. It offers an immersive context that makes it possible to teach about ecosystems in the classroom, allowing exploration of the complexities of large scale problems, extended time frames and and multiple causality. To more fully understand how ecosystems work, students need the opportunity to experiment and to observe what happens. This project will advance this earlier work by developing ways for students to conduct experiments within the virtual world and to see the results of those experiments. The project will work with ecosystem scientists to study the types of experiments that they conduct, informing knowledge in education about how ecosystem scientists think, and will build opportunities for students that mirror what scientists do. The project will develop a modified virtual world and accompanying curriculum for middle school students to help them learn to more deeply understand ecosystems patterns and the strengths and limitations of experimentation in ecosystems science. The resulting program will be tested against existing practice, the EcoMUVE program alone, and other programs that teach aspects of ecosystems dynamics to help teachers know how to best use these curricula in the classroom.

      Taking Games to School: Exploratory Study to Support Game-based Teaching and Learning In High-School Science Classes

      This project is building a set of software tools, including a tool for annotating screen recordings of activities in games, a teacher data dashboard for information about students' in-game learning, and tools to help teachers customize activities in games to better align with curricular standards. The project will find out whether these new tools can enhance teaching and/or learning. 

      Lead Organization(s): 
      Partner Organization(s): 
      Award Number: 
      1415284
      Funding Period: 
      Tue, 07/15/2014 to Sat, 06/30/2018
      Full Description: 

      Research shows that educational games can enhance students' science learning, but current work leaves teachers dependent on researchers and games companies to provide good games and game-based curricula. This project aims to study how teachers can be involved in making science learning games more effective, and how educational science games can better support good teaching. This project is building a set of software tools, including a tool for annotating screen recordings of activities in games, a teacher data dashboard for information about students' in-game learning, and tools to help teachers customize activities in games to better align with curricular standards. It will conduct studies with successful research-based educational games for learning science, and popularly available educational games from websites such as BrainPop, in a network of teachers who have experience using 'canned' games in their classrooms. The project will find out whether these new tools can enhance teaching and/or learning. It will also help develop a list of the types of customization options teachers need in order to be able to effectively use educational games in their classrooms. If successful, this research could point the way towards new tools that let teachers create activities that turn any game into an educational game, and to better use existing educational games in their classrooms. This could greatly speed up our ability to deliver high-quality learning experiences through educational games.

      This project involves a participatory design process in which a small number of experienced teachers will feed into a principled, iterative refinement of prototypes of the tools (annotation, data dashboard, and level-builder) to be prototyped within the Brainplay suite. In the beta testing phase, a hierarchical linear model analysis will be conducted on both student and teacher outcomes in 25 classrooms. In addition to the quantitative analysis, qualitative studies involving classroom observations, focus groups, and teacher journaling will be conducted to examine impact on teaching practices and refine the functional specifications. Project dissemination will take place through the community around the previously-developed Leveling Up games (played around 10,000 times per week), and through existing professional networks such as Edmodo. The project will also work within the games community to help inform possible approaches to logging learning data and allowing teacher customization across all games.

      Researching the Impact of an Online MOOC Designed to Transform Student Engagement and Achievement in Mathematics

      This study examines non-cognitive factors, mindsets, cognitive factors, and strategies for learning mathematics, in the context of a MOOC combined with classroom instruction for middle grades students in mathematics. No previous mindset study has researched the impact of mindset messages within mathematics, and the proposed study will add important knowledge to this field.

      Lead Organization(s): 
      Award Number: 
      1443790
      Funding Period: 
      Tue, 07/01/2014 to Tue, 06/30/2015
      Full Description: 

      This project is designed to study a Massively Open Online Course (MOOC), expected to have approximately 2 million students, which will supplement middle grades mathematics classes to understand the impact on students' mathematical learning and engagement in mathematics. The MOOC learning environment, used with school aged children in concert with their regular mathematics course, focuses on helping students to develop positive and productive beliefs, or growth mindsets, about their own potential in mathematics and to teach the students a range of strategies that lead to mathematics success. A better understanding of growth mindsets and learning how to learn mathematics in the context of regular classroom instruction potentially makes important contributions in introducing a new intervention to tens of thousands of students. This contribution is made in concert with providing evidence of impact of using MOOCs coupled with classroom instruction with school aged children on student learning. If the study finds that the mathematics intervention MOOC significantly increases students' achievement and engagement with mathematics, it can be scaled nationally and potentially change the face of mathematics education in the United States.

      This study examines non-cognitive factors, mindsets, cognitive factors, and strategies for learning mathematics, in the context of a MOOC combined with classroom instruction for middle grades students in mathematics. No previous mindset study has researched the impact of mindset messages within mathematics, and the proposed study will add important knowledge to this field. The study will also contribute to new knowledge of MOOCs, of their potential as learning opportunities and of the design of innovative pedagogies. Using a blocked randomized control trial of 10,000 students in two California districts, the statistical design employed will enable schools to implement the program across entire classes of students. The study employs measures of pre/post changes in mathematics engagement, mindset, use of mathematics strategies, and mathematics achievement, with close examination of the implications for girls, students of color, students of different socio-economic-status and low achieving students.

      GRIDS: Graphing Research on Inquiry with Data in Science

      The Graphing Research on Inquiry with Data in Science (GRIDS) project will investigate strategies to improve middle school students' science learning by focusing on student ability to interpret and use graphs. GRIDS will undertake a comprehensive program to address the need for improved graph comprehension. The project will create, study, and disseminate technology-based assessments, technologies that aid graph interpretation, instructional designs, professional development, and learning materials.

      Award Number: 
      1418423
      Funding Period: 
      Mon, 09/01/2014 to Sat, 08/31/2019
      Full Description: 

      The Graphing Research on Inquiry with Data in Science (GRIDS) project is a four-year full design and development proposal, addressing the learning strand, submitted to the DR K-12 program at the NSF. GRIDS will investigate strategies to improve middle school students' science learning by focusing on student ability to interpret and use graphs. In middle school math, students typically graph only linear functions and rarely encounter features used in science, such as units, scientific notation, non-integer values, noise, cycles, and exponentials. Science teachers rarely teach about the graph features needed in science, so students are left to learn science without recourse to what is inarguably a key tool in learning and doing science. GRIDS will undertake a comprehensive program to address the need for improved graph comprehension. The project will create, study, and disseminate technology-based assessments, technologies that aid graph interpretation, instructional designs, professional development, and learning materials.

      GRIDS will start by developing the GRIDS Graphing Inventory (GGI), an online, research-based measure of graphing skills that are relevant to middle school science. The project will address gaps revealed by the GGI by designing instructional activities that feature powerful digital technologies including automated guidance based on analysis of student generated graphs and student writing about graphs. These materials will be tested in classroom comparison studies using the GGI to assess both annual and longitudinal progress. Approximately 30 teachers selected from 10 public middle schools will participate in the project, along with approximately 4,000 students in their classrooms. A series of design studies will be conducted to create and test ten units of study and associated assessments, and a minimum of 30 comparison studies will be conducted to optimize instructional strategies. The comparison studies will include a minimum of 5 experiments per term, each with 6 teachers and their 600-800 students. The project will develop supports for teachers to guide students to use graphs and science knowledge to deepen understanding, and to develop agency and identity as science learners.

      Integrating Quality Talk Professional Development to Enhance Professional Vision and Leadership for STEM Teachers in High-Need Schools

      This project expands and augments a currently-funded NSF Noyce Track II teacher recruitment and retention grant with Quality Talk (QT), an innovative, scalable teacher-facilitated discourse model. Over the course of four years, the work will address critical needs in physics and chemistry education in 10th through 12th grade classrooms by strengthening the capacity of participating teachers to design and implement lessons that support effective dialogic interactions.

      Award Number: 
      1316347
      Funding Period: 
      Mon, 07/15/2013 to Fri, 06/30/2017
      Full Description: 

      This project expands and augments a currently-funded NSF Noyce Track II teacher recruitment and retention grant with Quality Talk (QT), an innovative, scalable teacher-facilitated discourse model. It is hypothesized that the QT model will enhance pre- and in-service secondary teachers' development of professional vision and leadership skills necessary for 21st century STEM education. Over the course of four years, the work will address critical needs in physics and chemistry education in 10th through 12th grade classrooms in five of Georgia's high-need school districts by strengthening the capacity of participating teachers to design and implement lessons that support effective dialogic interactions. As a result of such interactions, students' scientific literacy will be enhanced, including their ability to participate in content-rich discourse (i.e., QT) through effective disciplinary critical-analytic thinking and epistemic cognition. The contributions of this project, beyond the tangible benefits for teacher and student participants, include the development, refinement, and dissemination of an effective QT intervention and professional developmental framework that the entire science education community can use to promote scientific literacy and understanding.

      The project goals are being achieved through a series of three studies employing complementary methods and data sources, and a focus upon dissemination of the model in the final project year. The first two years of the project focus on developing and refining the curricular and intervention efficacy materials using design-based research methods. In Year 3, the project engages in a quasi-experimental study of the refined QT model, followed by further refinements before disseminating the materials both within Georgia and throughout the national science education community in Year 4. Quantitative measures of teacher and student discourse and knowledge, as well as video-coding and qualitative investigations of intervention efficacy, are being analyzed using multiple methods. In collaboration with, but independent from project staff and stakeholders, the participatory and responsive evaluation utilizes a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct formative and summative evaluation.

      Over the course of four years, the project will involve the participation of approximately 32 teachers in Georgia whose students include substantive percentages from populations underrepresented in the STEM fields. In addition to advancing their own students' scientific literacy, these participating teachers receive professional development on how to train other teachers, outside of the project, in using QT to promote scientific literacy. Further, the project will conduct a QT Summit for educational stakeholders and non-participant teachers to disseminate the intervention and professional development model. Finally, the project team will disseminate the findings widely to applied and scholarly communities through a website with materials and PD information (http://www.qualitytalk.org), professional journals, conferences, and NSF's DRK-12 Resource Network. This project, with its focus on teacher leadership and the pedagogical content knowledge necessary to use discourse to promote student science literacy, significantly advances the nation's goals of producing critical consumers and producers of scientific knowledge.

      Promoting Students' Spatial Thinking in Upper Elementary Grades using Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

      This project explores the potential for enhancing students' interest and ability in STEM disciplines by broadening fourth grade students' understanding and interest in the spatial perspectives inherent in geography and other science disciplines. The project tests a set of hypotheses that posit that the use of GIS in the classroom results in a measureable improvement in students' spatial reasoning and motivation.

      Lead Organization(s): 
      Partner Organization(s): 
      Award Number: 
      1316660
      Funding Period: 
      Sun, 09/01/2013 to Wed, 08/31/2016
      Full Description: 

      This project explores the potential for enhancing students' interest and ability in STEM disciplines by broadening fourth grade students' understanding and interest in the spatial perspectives inherent in geography and other science disciplines. The study incorporates the latest developments in the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) within the classroom. The project tests a set of hypotheses that posit that the use of GIS in the classroom results in a measureable improvement in students' spatial reasoning and motivation. Geography teachers in elementary schools are trained to use GIS software to create digital maps specific to the subject matter and projects on which their students work. Students then work in small collaborative groups and engage in open discussions designed to enhance the development and use of their spatial and multi-step causal reasoning.

      GIS has been used in middle and high school settings. This project introduces GIS to upper elementary grades particularly to allow students an early opportunity to be involved in meaningful data and map-driven activities to promote their spatial skills. The proposal team predicts that the traditional gap between girls and boys in spatial skills will shrink with training thus will be strongly pronounced in the experimental relative to control groups. The project documents the effectiveness of instructional practices that are likely to enhance multistep reasoning, systems thinking, conceptual and spatial understanding, and motivation for learning while learning to work with maps to solve problems involving geography and ecological awareness. The project develops instructional methods that incorporate innovative tools for promoting problem solving to address real-life issues in this increasingly technology-driven era. The innovative tool is open-source and designed for professionals, but it can be modified to be child-friendly. Classroom activities are integrated with science and social studies curricula and content standards. Teachers are expected to find the curriculum attractive and easy to implement.

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