Login

Classroom Practice

First Name: 
Cristina Masetti
About Me (Bio): 
I'm a student of mestrado in Brazil. I'm research how teachers use the curriculum materials to help theier students to learn.
Classroom Practice
First Name: 
Joseph Brobst
Professional Title: 
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
Organization/Institution: 

Navigating to NGSS Success: Identifying a Research Agenda

Day: 
Wed

Leaders of three DR K-12 projects identify successful instructional strategies for using technology-enhanced curriculum materials, games, and models to achieve the NGSS practices.

Date/Time: 
9:45 am - 11:45 am
2014 Session Types: 
Collaborative Panel Session

The media, the public, and, indeed, many teachers have significantly criticized the introduction of the Common Core, citing concerns such as that it overcomplicates simple topics, diminishes innovation, and ignores equity issues. Following the recent introduction of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), we need compelling examples and powerful research to prevent premature criticism and ensure successful implementation. In this session, leaders of three DR K–12 projects (Leonardo, CLASS, FORCES)—who are taking advantage of technology to develop instructional strategies that incorporate the NGSS practices for diverse elementary, middle, and high school students—provide examples and stimulate discussion leading to a research agenda.

The Leonardo project is developing and investigating an intelligent cyberlearning system for interactive scientific modeling in elementary science education. Students use Leonardo’s intelligent virtual notebooks to create and experiment with interactive models of physical phenomena. CLASS is using automated scoring to integrate guidance alongside models and simulations to improve middle school students' scientific explanations. The FORCES project is developing and testing coherent interdisciplinary instructional materials using physical and computer-based models and simulations to help high school students visualize interactions at the molecular level. Students construct and revise models and explanations to provide causal accounts of personally relevant examples.

This interactive session starts with short presentations and questions for each project. Small groups led by individuals from each project identify cross-project research questions and report back. The group then synthesizes the questions and set priorities for a research agenda.

Perspectives for Advancing the Effectiveness of Elementary Science Instruction for Student Learning: Importance and Challenges

Day: 
Wed

Presenters discuss how their projects contribute systemically to the design, implementation, and evaluation of quality elementary science programs.

Date/Time: 
9:45 am - 11:45 am
2014 Session Types: 
Collaborative Panel Session

Quality elementary science programs are faced with the challenge of adapting and/or building upon the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) in order to provide an essential foundation for student learning and interest in science. As such, these science programs must address how the practices of science can be linked with cross-cutting concepts through meaningful learning contexts that, of necessity, evolve progressively across grades. Thus, the challenge for elementary science involves innovative curriculum design and assessment in conjunction with professional development models that support conceptually sound K–5 science instruction.

This session provides a forum through which NSF researchers, exploring a variety of approaches for improving elementary science, lead discussions—with active participant involvement—on how the ideas presented can contribute to the systemic development of quality science instruction and student learning. The discussion also addresses the potential impact of the present work for student achievement in STEM as measured by direct effects in grades K–5 and transfer effects to middle school; the design of curriculum models and assessment tools; and models of professional development.

The session covers (1) the case for the importance of elementary science, (2) perspectives and models of quality elementary science, (3) issues and challenges for achieving quality elementary science programs, and (4) how each project contributes systemically to the design, implementation, and evaluation of quality elementary science.

Exploring the Challenges of Supporting Teachers to Enact Ambitious Instruction and Curriculum Practices in Mathematics

Day: 
Tues

This session addresses challenges related to supporting teachers’ use of curriculum materials to address the challenging features of the CCSSM.

Date/Time: 
1:45 pm - 3:45 pm
2014 Session Types: 
Collaborative Panel Session
Session Materials: 

The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) offer an opportunity for districts to push teachers to enact ambitious practices around instruction and curriculum use. However, taking up ambitious practices entails a number of challenges, some of which were evident during the NCTM Standards reform movement in the 1990s and early 2000s, and some of which reflect new approaches and new policy contexts. In this session, the presenters discuss the implementation of curriculum and instruction consistent with the more ambitious features of the CCSSM in middle school mathematics, particularly the mathematical practices and the conceptual orientation espoused in the CCSSM framework, and address the following challenges:

  • Increasing school/district capacity to support teachers
  • Understanding of features of curriculum materials that depart from mastery learning perspective
  • Viewing the CCSSM as more than an articulation of content—seeing the CCSSM as embodying a philosophy of mathematics instruction akin to what was articulated in the 1989 and 2000 NCTM Standards (e.g., mathematics as a process-oriented subject area in which problem solving, exploration, and communication are integral to development of conceptual understanding)
  • Meeting the needs of diverse learners

Building Theory While Supporting Implementation of the NGSS

Day: 
Tues

Implementing the NGSS requires changes in teaching, assessments, and curriculum materials. In this session, participants explore theoretical questions for DR K12 research that are raised by these NGSS implementation challenges.

Date/Time: 
1:45 pm - 3:45 pm
2014 Session Types: 
Mini-plenary Presentation

The Next Generation Science Standards present important shifts for science teaching, assessment, and curriculum materials—focusing on core explanatory ideas, a central role for science and engineering practices, and coherence across time and science disciplines. These challenges for practice require new theoretical advances. This session explores connections between problems of practice and theory–building research needed for the NGSS to identify synergies across DR K12 projects. Four projects present approaches to these theory-practice connections:

1. Developing a Model to Support Student Understanding of Sub-Microscopic Interactions. This project is developing curriculum materials to support students developing models of sub-microscopic objects’ interactions to explain behavior of physical and living systems that align with performance expectations in the NGSS.

2. Supporting Scientific Practices in Elementary and Middle School. This project is developing a learning progression describing students’ increasing sophistication in meaningful use of scientific practices to develop mechanistic, explanatory models through argumentation, and exploring teaching strategies that support this progression.

3. Modeling Scientific Practice in High School Biology. This project is developing educative curriculum materials to explore the curriculum and pedagogical resources needed to support teachers in enacting instruction that engages students in model-based reasoning in biology.

4. Designing Assessments in Physical Science Across Three Dimensions. Evidence-centered design drives research to develop models for assessment that blend content and practices as highlighted in the NGSS performance expectations, including how proficiency changes over time with instruction.

Following brief presentations from these projects, session attendees discuss how their projects are connected to these theoretical and practice-oriented issues, and identify synergies across DR K12 projects for meeting the needs of theory and practice.

Using Life Cycle Data to Help Teachers Understand Key Energy Concepts

Day: 
Tues

Participants engage in and provide feedback on digital interactive learning experiences that use National Renewable Energy Laboratory life cycle data and help teachers understand key energy concepts. Please bring your laptop.

Date/Time: 
9:45 am - 11:45 am
2014 Session Types: 
Feedback Session (Work in Development)
Presenters: 
Session Materials: 

Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) and project partners are developing an online course for high school science teachers. The purpose of the course is to help teachers understand key energy concepts in alternative energy contexts. The course includes three interactive learning experiences (interactives) that use life cycle data from the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). These interactives allow teachers to examine the inputs and outputs for the generation of electrical energy from coal-fired and nuclear power plants and the production of ethanol from corn, corn stover, and switchgrass. During the first field test, teachers enjoyed using the first life cycle data interactive but struggled to understand the benefit of examining data across systems (for example, comparing inputs and outputs for a coal-fired power plant to those for a nuclear power plant).

The goals for this session are to share with colleagues the project’s approach to helping teachers use complex life cycle data to better understand energy generation from a systems perspective and gain feedback on how the project might improve the experience for teachers. At the session, participants:

1. briefly learn about the structure and goals of the online course;

2. briefly review NREL data and its use in the interactive experiences;

3. engage with the interactives, answering questions that are posed for teachers in the materials;

4. participate in a discussion of the strengths and limitations of the interactives and how they might be improved; and

5. discuss how the interactives may be adjusted for use with high school students.

Using Learning Progressions for Classroom Assessment and Teaching

Day: 
Tues

Join a discussion addressing how learning progression-based frameworks, assessments, and instruction can support teachers and students in developing increasingly sophisticated scientific knowledge and practice.

Date/Time: 
9:45 am - 11:45 am
2014 Session Types: 
Collaborative Panel Session

The goal of this session is to discuss possibilities, progress, and problems in using learning progression research to support improved assessment and instruction in middle school and high school classrooms.

In this session, several learning progression-related DR K–12 projects share findings and discuss questions around two issues:

1. Assessments. What progress have we made toward developing and validating learning progression-based assessment systems that can be used by classroom teachers to support instruction and student learning? Can those assessments also be used to monitor progress with respect to core science education documents such as the Next Generation Science Standards? How could/should/will this integration impact those engaged in science education research, teaching, teacher professional development, etc.?

2. Classroom instruction. What progress are we making toward developing learning progression-based instructional supports for classroom use? What types of teaching and learning beliefs and practices do teachers need to make effective use of learning progressions in the classroom? How do early adopter teachers make use of learning progressions in their instruction?

The discussion addresses both progress to date and future possibilities and issues, such as how continuing work in refining learning progression-based assessments, instructional materials, and professional development experiences can make learning progressions more useful and productive for classroom teaching and assessment.

Meaningful Support for Teachers: Specific Ways to Encourage Game-Based Learning in the Classroom

Day: 
Tues

Panelists from three projects share lessons learned in guiding game use in classroom learning, highlighting specific examples of effective resources.

Date/Time: 
9:45 am - 11:45 am
2014 Session Types: 
Collaborative Panel Session
Session Materials: 

The three panelists in this session are in the last one or two years of their game-based learning projects, and all have done extensive work in supporting use of their games in classroom learning. As their work has progressed, each has discovered valuable ways to support teachers as well as encountered surprises in what teachers wanted (and didn’t want), and now recognize things they wished they had learned in the beginning of their projects. Session participants leave with recommendations they can use in their current projects, including:

  • specific strategies for identifying teachers’ needs,
  • examples of tools for teachers that could be used as a models for other projects, and
  • resources and partnerships for future collaboration.

 Rather than presenting on each project in series, speakers work as a panel to address the following issues, leaving room for active discussion from workshop participants:

  • the process used to identify needs and develop tools;
  • types of materials the presenters have found helpful for:
    • professional development
    • use of games in general
    • use of these projects’ games
    • learning communities (for teachers and learners)
  • most significant discoveries in guiding teachers (such as the discomfort many teachers have in letting a game "teach" rather than "provide practice," and the types of support learners need in game play and different ways teachers can provide that support)
  • future steps for continuing teacher support in the use of developed games.

Equitable Teaching Practices in Math

Day: 
Tues

Presenters seek feedback on an observational instrument designed to identify preservice teachers’ abilities to identify equitable teaching practices.

Date/Time: 
9:45 am - 11:45 am
2014 Session Types: 
Feedback Session (Work in Development)

The original version of the Mathematical Quality and Equity (MQE) video codes (Goffney, 2010; LMT, 2010) were developed as a section of the Mathematical Quality and Instruction observational instrument developed by the Learning Mathematics for Teaching Project at the University of Michigan.

Over two years, the project has conducted literature reviews, consulted with experts, and studied videos of teaching to refine and repurpose the original MQE codes for use with pre-service teachers. Common themes of equitable teaching emerged, such as sensitive use of real-world contexts, positioning of learners in the classroom, explicitness, and elements of complex instruction.

Additionally, central themes of equitable teaching emerged, including teacher expectations, context and rigor of tasks, mathematics practices and attention to developing mathematical language, issues of access, participation structures, and group work. Each of these requires mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) and cultural knowledge for working with diverse learners. A version of the repurposed MQE tool was piloted in the fall of 2012. The Learning Mathematics for Teaching project also conducted focus group and cognitive interviews, which informed how pre-service teachers interpreted the codes. The final version of the tool was generated in the fall of 2013.

This session includes an overview of the emerging framework for Mathematical Knowledge for Equitable Teaching. Participants have opportunities to use the MQE tool to code video clips of teaching.

Syndicate content