High

The Joys of Teaching Ecology in K–12 and Informal Settings

Esposito, R. M. M, Harris, C., Berkowitz, A. R., & Pregnal, M. (2019). The joys of teaching ecology in K-12 and informal settings. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 17(9), 538-539. https://doi.org/10.1002/fee.2122

Author/Presenter: 
Rhea M  M Esposito
Cornelia Harris
Alan R Berkowitz
Maribel Pregnall
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

This article describes opportunities for primary and secondary ecology education in formal and informal settings.

Supporting Students' Pathways through the Cycle of Inquiry and Justification

The Cycle of Inquiry and Justification was delineated as an essential concept for High School Mathematics (NCTM, 2018). After spending three years observing this cycle in classrooms, we identified the transition from conjecturing to proving as a key site for conceptual obstacles. These obstacles and strategies for overcoming them are explored. This presentation was part of the NCTM 100 Days of Professional Learning.
 
Author/Presenter: 
Michelle Cirillo
Jenifer Hummer
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

This NCTM 100 Days of Professional Learning webinar explores the cycle of inquiry and justification, conceptual obstacles, and strategies for overcoming these obstacles.

Investigating Immigration to the U.S.: Module Overview and Sample Lessons

The Investigating Immigration to the U.S. module focuses on describing, comparing, and making sense of categorical variables. Students investigate questions such as: Are there more immigrants in the U.S. today than in previous years? Where have most immigrants been coming from? Are immigrants as likely as the U.S. born to be participating in the labor force?

Author/Presenter: 
SDLC Project Team
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

This sample document contains 1) an overview of the module lessons and learning objectives; 2) the teacher guide for Lesson 4, titled Are there more immigrants in the U.S. today than in previous years?; 3) the teacher guide for Lesson 5, titled Where have most immigrants been coming from?;and 3) the team data investigation.

Investigating Income Inequality in the U.S.: Module Overview and Sample Lessons

The Investigating Income Inequality in the U.S. module focuses on describing, comparing, and making sense of quantitative variables. Students deepen their understanding of this content by investigating questions such as: How have incomes for higher- and lower-income individuals in the U.S. changed over time? How much income inequality exists between males and females in the U.S.? Does education explain the wage gap between males and females?

Author/Presenter: 
SDLC Project Team
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

This sample document contains 1) an overview of the module lessons and learning objectives; 2) the teacher guide for Lesson 4, titled How have middle-income earners in the U.S. been doing over time?; 3) the teacher guide for Lesson 6, titled How much income inequality exists between males and females in the U.S.?; and 4) the team data investigation.

Webinar Resources: Analyzing Teacher Learning in a Community of Practice Centered on Video Cases of Mathematics Teaching

In this webinar, presenters 

Author/Presenter: 
Joseph DiNapoli
Eileen Murray
Doug O'Roark
John Russell
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

In this webinar, presenters Joseph DiNapoliEileen MurrayDoug O'Roark, and John Russell, shared the evolution of an analytic method that aims to reveal how secondary mathematics teachers build knowledge while collectively analyzing and discussing video of mathematics teaching, and engaged webinar participants with that analytic method to gather feedback on the approach developed through the DRK-12 projects, Building a Teacher Knowledge Base for the Implementation of High-Quality Instructional Resources through the Collaborative Investigation of Video Cases

Restoring Mathematics Identities of Black Learners: A Curricular Approach

Black learners are subject to systemic physical, symbolic, and epistemological violence in mathematics classrooms. Such violence has negative ramifications for Black children’s mathematics learning and identity development. The authors argue that space should be made within the mathematics classroom to repair the harm caused by this violence. This article describes an identity-based curriculum, Mathematics for Justice, Identity, and meta-Cognition (or MaJIC), that provides a form of mathematics therapy through a restorative justice framework.

Author/Presenter: 
Maisie L. Gholson
Darrius D. Robinson
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

This article describes an identity-based curriculum, Mathematics for Justice, Identity, and meta-Cognition (or MaJIC), that provides a form of mathematics therapy through a restorative justice framework.

Backward Transfer Effects when Learning about Quadratic Functions

Presentation slides from the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education.

Hohensee, C., Willoughby, L., & Gartland, S. (2018, July). Backward transfer effects when learning about quadratic functions. In E. Bergqvist, M. Österholm, C. Granberg, & L. Sumpter (Eds.), Proceedings of the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 5, p. 65). Umeå, Sweden: PME.

Author/Presenter: 
Charles Hohensee
Laura Willoughby
Sara Gartland
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 

Presentation slides from the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education.

Backward Transfer Effects on Action and Process Views of Functions

Presentation slides from the 41st annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education.

Hohensee, C., Gartland, S., & Willoughby, L. (2019, November). Backward transfer effects on action and process views of functions. In S. Otten, A. G. Candela, Z. de Araujo, C. Haines, & C. Munter (Eds.), Proceedings of the 41st annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. St Louis, MO: University of Missouri.

Author/Presenter: 
Charles Hohensee
Sara Gartland
Laura Willoughby
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

Presentation slides from the 41st annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education.

Building Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Proof in Geometry

Presentation slides and handout from the 2019 NCTM Regional Conference in Nashville, TN.

Author/Presenter: 
Michelle Cirillo
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 

Presentation slides and handout from the 2019 NCTM Regional Conference in Nashville, TN.

Mathematics Teaching Has Its Own Imperatives: Mathematical Practice and the Work of Mathematics Instruction

How should we expect growing understandings of the nature of mathematical practice to inform classroom mathematical practice? We address this question from a perspective that takes seriously the notion that mathematics education, as a societal enterprise, is accountable to multiple sets of stakeholders, with the discipline of mathematics being only one of them. As they lead instruction, teachers can benefit from the influence of understandings of mathematical practice but they also need to recognize obligations to other stakeholders.

Author/Presenter: 
Patricio Herbst
Daniel Chazan
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2020
Short Description: 

In the article, the authors locate how mathematics instruction may actively respond to the influence of the discipline of mathematics and exemplify how obligations to other stakeholders may participate in the practical rationality of mathematics teaching as those influences are incorporated into instruction.

Pages

Subscribe to High