Science

Thinking scientifically in a changing world

Shifting people’s judgments toward the scientific involves teaching them to purposefully evaluate connections between evidence and alternative explanations.

Lombardi, D. (2019). Thinking scientifically in a changing world. Science Brief: Psychological Science Agenda, 33(1). Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2019/01/changing-world.aspx

Author/Presenter: 
Doug Lombardi
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
Shifting people’s judgments toward the scientific involves teaching them to purposefully evaluate connections between evidence and alternative explanations.

Scaffolding scientific thinking: Students’ evaluations and judgments during Earth science knowledge construction

Critical evaluation underpins the practices of science. In a three-year classroom-based research project, we developed and tested instructional scaffolds for Earth science content in which students evaluate lines of evidence with respect to alternative explanations of scientific phenomena (climate change, fracking and earthquakes, wetlands and land use, and formation of Earth’s Moon).

Author/Presenter: 
Doug Lombardi
Janelle M. Bailey
Elliot S. Bickel
Shondricka Burrell
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
The present paper documents a quasi-experimental study where high school Earth science students completed these instructional scaffolds, including an explanation task scored for evaluative levels (erroneous, descriptive, relational, and critical), along with measures of plausibility reappraisal and knowledge.

MEL Teaching Resources

The MEL project has developed a set of teaching resources to support the teaching of controversial and/or complex Earth and space science topics. Previously developed MEL teaching resources include those for climate change, earthquakes and fracking, wetlands use, and the formation of the moon. Current baMEL resources are under development for extreme weather, fossils and Earth's past, freshwater availability, and origins of the universe.

Author/Presenter: 
Doug Lombardi
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
The MEL project has developed a set of teaching resources to support the teaching of controversial and/or complex Earth and space science topics.

Teachers' framing of argumentation goals: Working together to develop individual versus communal understanding

For students to meaningfully engage in science practices, substantive changes need to occur to deeply entrenched instructional approaches, particularly those related to classroom discourse. Because teachers are critical in establishing how students are permitted to interact in the classroom, it is imperative to examine their role in fostering learning environments in which students carry out science practices. This study explores how teachers describe, or frame, expectations for classroom discussions pertaining to the science practice of argumentation.

Author/Presenter: 
María González‐Howard
Katherine L. McNeill
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
This study explores how teachers describe, or frame, expectations for classroom discussions pertaining to the science practice of argumentation. Authors use the theoretical lens of a participation framework to examine how teachers emphasize particular actions and goals for their students' argumentation.

European Science Education Research Association 2019 ESERA Conference; Bologna, Italy

Event Date: 
Mon, 08/26/2019 (All day) to Fri, 08/30/2019 (All day)
Associated Dates and Deadlines: 

To learn more, visit https://www.esera.org/news/esera-announcements/653-esera-conference-2019.

DRK-12 Presenters:

  • Christa Haverly*, Michigan State University

*Denotes CADRE Fellow or Fellows alumnus

Event Type: 
Discipline / Topic: 

Developing a Three-Dimensional View of Science Teaching: A Tool to Support Preservice Teacher Discourse

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC, 2012) on which they are based, describe a new vision for science education that includes having students learn science in a way that more closely aligns to how scientists and engineers work and think. Accomplishing this goal will require teacher educators to make important shifts in the ways they prepare future science teachers (NRC, 2012). Many science teaching methods courses are being reformed to better support future science teachers to meet the ambitious goals of the NGSS.

Author/Presenter: 
Michelle L. Sinapuelas
Corinne Lardy
Michele A. Korb
Christine Lee Bae
Rachelle DiStefano
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
This study utilized the methodology of Improvement Science “Plan, Do Study, Act” cycles in order to design a Three-Dimensional Mapping Tool (3D Map) as a visual scaffold for use in science teaching methods courses to support preservice teachers in unpacking the components of NGSS and to promote discourse related to the three-dimensionality of planning instruction.

Promoting Linguistically Diverse Students’ Short-Term and Long-Term Understanding of Chemical Phenomena Using Visualizations

Ensuring that all students, including English language learners (ELLs) who speak English as a second language, succeed in science is more challenging with a shift towards learning through language-intensive science practices suggested by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Interactive visualization technologies have the potential to support science learning for all students, including ELLs, by providing explicit representations of unobservable scientific systems.

Author/Presenter: 
Kihyun Ryoo
Kristin Bedell
Amanda Swearingen
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
In this study, we examine the short-term and long-term effects of interactive visualizations in improving linguistically diverse eighth-grade students’ understanding of properties of matter and chemical reactions during inquiry instruction.

Using a three‐dimensional thinking graph to support inquiry learning

The use of external representations has a potential to facilitate inquiry learning, especially in hypothesis generation and scientific reasoning, which are typical difficulties encountered by students. This study proposes and investigates the effects of a three‐dimensional thinking graph (3DTG) that allows learners to combine in a single image, problem information, subject knowledge (key concepts and their relationships), and the hypothesizing and reasoning process involved in exploring a problem, to support inquiry learning.

Author/Presenter: 
Juanjuan Chen
Minhong Wang
Tina A. Grotzer
Chris Dede
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
This study proposes and investigates the effects of a three‐dimensional thinking graph (3DTG) that allows learners to combine in a single image, problem information, subject knowledge (key concepts and their relationships), and the hypothesizing and reasoning process involved in exploring a problem, to support inquiry learning.

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