Astronomy

In Praise of Messy Data

Gould, R. R., S. Sunbury, & Dussault, M. (2014). In praise of messy data: Lessons from the search for alien worlds. The Science Teacher, 31.

Author/Presenter: 
Roy Gould
Susan Sunbury
Mary Dussault
Year: 
2014
Short Description: 
Lessons from the search for alien worlds.

Using online telescopes to explore exoplanets from the physics classroom

The search for habitable planets offers excellent opportunities to advance students’ understanding of core ideas in physics, including gravity and the laws of motion, the interaction of light and matter, and especially the nature of scientific inquiry. Thanks to the development of online telescopes, students can detect more than a dozen of the known exoplanets from the classroom, using data they gather, assess, and interpret for themselves. We present a suite of activities in which students apply basic physics concepts to their investigations of exoplanets.

Author/Presenter: 
Roy R. Gould
Susan Sunbury
Ruth Krumhansl
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 
Authors present a suite of activities in which students apply basic physics concepts to their investigations of exoplanets. The activities were developed and successfully tested with physics and earth science teachers in secondary schools in 14 states.

Thinking scientifically in a changing world

Shifting people’s judgments toward the scientific involves teaching them to purposefully evaluate connections between evidence and alternative explanations.

Lombardi, D. (2019). Thinking scientifically in a changing world. Science Brief: Psychological Science Agenda, 33(1). Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2019/01/changing-world.aspx

Author/Presenter: 
Doug Lombardi
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2019
Short Description: 
Shifting people’s judgments toward the scientific involves teaching them to purposefully evaluate connections between evidence and alternative explanations.

Scaffolding scientific thinking: Students’ evaluations and judgments during Earth science knowledge construction

Critical evaluation underpins the practices of science. In a three-year classroom-based research project, we developed and tested instructional scaffolds for Earth science content in which students evaluate lines of evidence with respect to alternative explanations of scientific phenomena (climate change, fracking and earthquakes, wetlands and land use, and formation of Earth’s Moon).

Author/Presenter: 
Doug Lombardi
Janelle M. Bailey
Elliot S. Bickel
Shondricka Burrell
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2018
Short Description: 
The present paper documents a quasi-experimental study where high school Earth science students completed these instructional scaffolds, including an explanation task scored for evaluative levels (erroneous, descriptive, relational, and critical), along with measures of plausibility reappraisal and knowledge.

Exploring the Unknown

Author/Presenter: 
Amy Pallant
Sarah Pryputniewicz
Hee-Sun Lee
Lead Organization(s): 
Year: 
2012
Short Description: 
This article describes The Concord Consortium's High-Adventure Science Project, which brings frontier science into the classroom, allowing students to explore questions in Earth and space science that scientists are currently investigating.

National NSTA Conference

Event Date: 
Thu, 03/18/2010 - 6:00am to Sun, 03/21/2010 - 11:00am
Associated Dates and Deadlines: 
January 22, 2010 - Earlybird registration deadline
February 12, 2010 - Advanced registration deadline

Join your colleagues in the City of Brotherly Love for NSTA's 58th National Conference on Science Education. Conference registration and exhibits will be at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Most sessions and events have been scheduled at the Convention Center and the Doubletree Philadelphia Hotel, Loew’s Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, and Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel.

Event Type: 

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