Patricio Herbst

People

Additional Phone Numbers: 
734-358-3550
Professional Title: 
Associate Professor of Mathematics Education
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
Pat Herbst is a mathematics educator interested in classroom mathematical work, instructional practices, the justifications of teachers’ actions, and the development of teacher capabilities. With project ThEMaT (funded by the National Science Foundation), Herbst pioneered the use of animated sketches of classroom stories to prompt discussions about instruction among teachers, in which they disclose the rationality that animates their work. In subsequent projects Herbst and his associates have designed software tools that enable teachers to interact with representations of classroom stories. He is now involved in an the development of instruments that can assess teachers’ knowledge and rationality in the context of problems of practice represented via classroom sketches.
Keywords: 
University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP)
08/15/2013

This research and development project is premised on the notion that recent technological developments have made it feasible to represent classroom work in new ways. In addition to watching recorded videos of classroom interactions or reading written cases, teacher educators and teachers can now watch animations and image sequences, realized with cartoon characters, and made to depict activities that happened, or could have happened, in a mathematics classroom.

University of Michigan (UM), University of Maryland (UMD)
09/01/2009

This project focuses on practicing and preservice secondary mathematics teachers and mathematics teacher educators. The project is researching, designing, and developing materials for preservice secondary mathematics teachers that enable them to acquire the mathematical knowledge and situated rationality central to teaching, in particular as it regards the leading of mathematical discussions in classrooms.

University of Michigan (UM)
08/01/2004

This project seeks to understand the practical rationality that undergirds teachers’ actions as they meet subject-specific goals of the teaching of algebra and geometry. The study develops a collection of representations of teaching that showcase possible classroom episodes and allows practitioners to ponder alternatives in teaching. The representations are built on computer animations and other forms of sequential art that display action over time.