Conference

Developing a Model of STEM-Focused Elementary Schools (eSTEM)

This project will study five elementary STEM schools from across the U.S. that are inclusive of students from underrepresented groups in order to determine what defines these schools and will use an iterative case study replication design to study the design and implementation of five exemplary eSTEM schools with the goal of developing a logic model that highlights the commonalities in core components and target outcomes across the schools, despite the different school contexts.

Lead Organization(s): 
Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1621005
Funding Period: 
Mon, 08/15/2016 to Wed, 07/31/2019
Full Description: 

In the United States (U.S.) certain groups are persistently underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers, especially Blacks, Hispanics, and low-income students who disproportionately fall out of the high-achieving group in K-12 education. Policymakers argue that future STEM workforce needs will only be met if there is broader diversity participating in STEM education and careers. Recent reports have suggested that the nation would benefit from more STEM-focused schools, including at the elementary school level, to inspire interest and prepare students for future STEM endeavors. However, there is currently little information on the number and quality of elementary STEM (eSTEM) schools and the extent to which underrepresented groups have access to them. This project will study five elementary STEM schools from across the U.S. that are inclusive of students from underrepresented groups in order to determine what defines these schools. The project team, which includes investigators from SRI International and George Mason University, initially identified twenty candidate critical components that define inclusive STEM-focused elementary schools and will refine and further clarify the critical components through the research study. The resulting research products could support the development of future eSTEM schools and research on their effectiveness.

The Discovery Research K-12 (DRK-12) program seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models, and tools. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. This Exploratory Learning Strand project will use an iterative case study replication design to study the design and implementation of five exemplary eSTEM schools with the goal of developing a logic model that highlights the commonalities in core components and target outcomes across the schools, despite the different school contexts. A framework of twenty design components, taken from research on inclusive STEM high schools and research on successful elementary schools, will inform the data collection, analysis, and logic model development. Schools as critical cases will be selected through a nomination process by experts, followed by screening and categorization according to key design components. School documents and public database information, a school survey, and telephone interviews with school administrators will inform screening and selection of candidate schools. Researchers will then conduct multi-day, on-site visitations to each selected school, collecting data from classroom observations, interviews with students, focus groups with teachers and administrators, and discussions with critical members of the school community. The project is also gathering data on school-level student outcome indicators. Using axial and open coding, the analysis aims to develop rich descriptions that showcase characteristics of the schools to iteratively determine a theory of action that illustrates interconnections among context, design, implementation, and outcomes. Research findings will be communicated through a logic model and blueprint, school case study reports, and conference proceedings and publications that will be provided on a project website, providing an immediate and ongoing resource for education leaders, researchers and policymakers to learn about research on these schools and particular models. Findings will also be disseminated by more traditional means, such as papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations, and webinars.

Developing Teachers as Computational Thinkers Through Supported Authentic Experiences in Computing Modeling and Simulation

This project addresses the need for a computationally-enabled STEM workforce by equipping teachers with the skills necessary to prepare students for future endeavors as computationally-enabled scientists and citizens, and by investigating the most effective ways to provide this instruction to teachers. The project also addresses the immediate challenge presented by NGSS to prepare middle school science teachers to implement rich computational thinking experiences within science classes.

Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1639069
Funding Period: 
Fri, 01/01/2016 to Sun, 06/30/2019
Full Description: 

The Discovery Research K-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools (RMTs). Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects.

This project addresses the need for a computationally-enabled STEM workforce by equipping teachers with the skills necessary to prepare students for future endeavors as computationally-enabled scientists and citizens, and by investigating the most effective ways to provide this instruction to teachers. The project also addresses the immediate challenge presented by the Next Generation Science Standards to prepare middle school science teachers to implement rich computational thinking (CT) experiences, such as the use, creation and analysis of computer models and simulations, within science classes.

The project, a partnership between the Santa Fe Institute and the Santa Fe Public School District, directly addresses middle school teachers' understanding, practice, and teaching of modern scientific practice. Using the Project GUTS program and professional development model as a foundation, this project will design and develop a set of Resources, Models, and Tools (RMTs) that collectively form the basis for a comprehensive professional development (PD) program, then study teachers' experiences with the RMTs and assess how well the RMTs prepared teachers to implement the curriculum. The PD program includes: an online PD network; workshops; webinars and conferences; practicum and facilitator support; and curricular and program guides. The overall approach to the project is design based implementation research (DBIR). Methods used for the implementation research includes: unobtrusive measures such as self-assessment sliders and web analytics; the knowledge and skills survey (KS-CT); interviews (teachers and the facilitators); analysis of teacher modified and created models; and observations of practicum and classroom implementations. Data collection and analysis in the implementation research serve two purposes: a) design refinement and b) case study development. The implementation research employs a mixed-method, nonequivalent group design with embedded case studies.

Expanding Opportunities for STEM Teacher Leadership

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Learn about issues, opportunities, and models of teacher leadership to create transformative learning environments and improve education policy and decision making.

Date/Time: 
2:15 pm to 3:45 pm
Session Materials: 

Effective teachers are crucial to efforts in improving student learning in K-12 STEM education. Effective teaching may be enhanced through innovative professional development that takes into account the stage of a teacher’s career continuum and opportunities for teachers to use their knowledge and wisdom of practice in various leadership capacities.

Session Types: 

Data-Intensive Research in Education: New Opportunities for Making an Impact

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Join a facilitated discussion about the application of data science to education, drawing on a recent NSF-sponsored report. Participants share insights from DR K–12 projects.

Date/Time: 
9:30 am to 11:00 am
Session Materials: 

The Computing Research Association’s report from an NSF-sponsored workshop describes seven next steps for data-intensive research in education:

Session Types: 

Thirteenth International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME-13) Travel Grant

This project will support the participation of 55 U.S. K-12 mathematics teachers or supervisors, graduate students, community college/university mathematics teachers, mathematicians, mathematics teacher educators and mathematics education researchers to attend the Thirteenth International Congress for Mathematical Education (ICME-13) to be held in Hamburg, Germany, July 24-31, 2016. The project will also prepare an educational status report (called the Fact Book) for the United States.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1503277
Funding Period: 
Mon, 06/15/2015 to Wed, 05/31/2017
Full Description: 

This project will support the participation of 55 U.S. K-12 mathematics teachers or supervisors, graduate students, community college/university mathematics teachers, mathematicians, mathematics teacher educators and mathematics education researchers to attend the Thirteenth International Congress for Mathematical Education (ICME-13) to be held in Hamburg, Germany, July 24-31, 2016. The project will also prepare an educational status report (called the Fact Book) for the United States. The research team will report on the state of U.S. mathematics education in 2016, through a Fact Book that builds from those published for ICMEs 9, 10, 11, and 12.

Through participation in the conference, American math educators will interact with mathematics educators from many countries and learn about their current math education practices concerning curriculum development, the use of technology in learning mathematics, strategies for reaching all students, teacher education and ongoing teacher professional development. The project is supported major national mathematics research and professional societies including the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, United States National Commission on Mathematical Instruction, Mathematical Association of America, American Mathematical Society and American Mathematical Association of Two Year Colleges. Participants will disseminate information and resources from the conference through these mathematics organizations, math education journals, and social media.

The Discovery Research K-12 (DRK-12) program seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models, and tools. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. This conference will advance the understanding of the U.S mathematics community regarding current international research and development in mathematics education, addressing the Teaching and Learning strands of the DRK-12 program.

Teachers with GUTS: Developing Teachers as Computational Thinkers Through Supported Authentic Experiences in Computing Modeling and Simulation

This project directly addresses middle school teachers' understanding, practice, and teaching of modern scientific practice. Using the Project GUTS program and professional development model as a foundation, this project will design and develop a set of Resources, Models, and Tools (RMTs) that collectively form the basis for a comprehensive professional development (PD) program, then study teachers' experiences with the RMTs and assess how well the RMTs prepared teachers to implement the curriculum.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1503383
Funding Period: 
Mon, 06/01/2015 to Thu, 06/30/2016
Full Description: 

This project addresses the need for a computationally-enabled STEM workforce by equipping teachers with the skills necessary to prepare students for future endeavors as computationally-enabled scientists and citizens, and by investigating the most effective ways to provide this instruction to teachers. The project also addresses the immediate challenge presented by the Next Generation Science Standards to prepare middle school science teachers to implement rich computational thinking (CT) experiences, such as the use, creation and analysis of computer models and simulations, within science classes. 

The project, a partnership between the Santa Fe Institute and the Santa Fe Public School District, directly addresses middle school teachers' understanding, practice, and teaching of modern scientific practice. Using the Project GUTS program and professional development model as a foundation, this project will design and develop a set of Resources, Models, and Tools (RMTs) that collectively form the basis for a comprehensive professional development (PD) program, then study teachers' experiences with the RMTs and assess how well the RMTs prepared teachers to implement the curriculum. The PD program includes: an online PD network; workshops; webinars and conferences; practicum and facilitator support; and curricular and program guides. The overall approach to the project is design based implementation research (DBIR). Methods used for the implementation research includes: unobtrusive measures such as self-assessment sliders and web analytics; the knowledge and skills survey (KS-CT); interviews (teachers and the facilitators); analysis of teacher modified and created models; and observations of practicum and classroom implementations. Data collection and analysis in the implementation research serve two purposes: a) design refinement and b) case study development. The implementation research employs a mixed-method, nonequivalent group design with embedded case studies.

View videos from their Foundations unit:

 

Scholarly Inquiry and Practices (SIP) Conference for Mathematics Education Methods

This project will convene mathematics teacher educators with different theoretical perspectives to develop a shared menu of research-supported practices and new research questions to explore that could improve mathematics methods courses.

Award Number: 
1503358
Funding Period: 
Mon, 06/01/2015 to Tue, 05/31/2016
Full Description: 

Mathematics methods courses are a critical component of mathematics teacher education. One criticism of mathematics methods courses is that they vary widely across institutions and states. Mathematics methods courses differ with respect to what is taught, how it is taught, the intended learning goals, and how those learning goals are assessed. This variation is due, in part, to the different theoretical perspectives of mathematics teacher educators who teach these courses. The investigators of this Conference and Workshop grant propose to convene mathematics teacher educators with different theoretical perspectives to develop a shared menu of research-supported practices and new research questions to explore that could improve mathematics methods courses. The investigators' hypothesis is that by drawing from the research knowledge base when designing methods courses (using scholarly practices) and by studying these courses to add to the research knowledge base (conducting scholarly inquiry), mathematics teacher educators of any theoretical perspective can contribute to collective efforts to improve the quality and coherence of mathematics methods courses. The investigators intend to disseminate the conference findings to mathematics teacher educators and mathematics education researchers through conference presentations, publications, teacher educator association websites, and the project website. A particular strength of this work is that it addresses a need to prioritize scholarly practices and scholarly inquiry that could improve the quality and coherence of mathematics methods courses across theoretical perspectives, mathematics teacher educators, institutions, and states. 

The Discovery Research K-12 (DRK-12) program seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models, and tools. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Scholarly Inquiry and Practices (SIP) Conference for Mathematics Education Methods is a Conference and Workshop project that builds from the investigators' prior studies, which revealed compelling questions mathematics teacher educators and mathematics education researchers need to address in order to improve mathematics methods courses. The project will convene forty mathematics teacher educators who identify with social-political, situated, or cognitive theoretical orientations to set a direction for building scholarly inquiry and practices in mathematics methods courses. Before the conference, participants will author abstracts and reflections about their methods courses and will survey local mathematics teachers to identify critical issues they perceive with mathematics teacher education. At the conference, participants will identify with a preferred theoretical orientation and participate in discussions around four themes: theoretical perspectives; building scholarly practices; research for informing practice; and assessing impact and residue. Some participants will be selected to present their abstracts in poster presentation format. Investigators will provide additional commentary that highlight common ideas that emerge across perspectives. Participants will organize in thematic research and writing teams and continue to work after the conference on co-authoring articles and conference presentations. The articles will be disseminated in a comprehensive monograph or special issue in a research-focused journal. Investigators have been invited to also publish articles in practitioner-focused journals. Presentations at research and practitioner conferences are also planned.

Implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards at the State Level: A Conference to Determine the Role of the Earth and Space Sciences Community

This conference is to develop a strategy for increasing the import of teaching Earth and Space Sciences in schools to make students ready for college and careers. The summit brings together key members of the Earth and Space Sciences (ESS) community to identify and devise ways in which they can work together to help states and school districts implement college and career readiness standards.

Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1440579
Funding Period: 
Tue, 07/01/2014 to Thu, 12/31/2015
Full Description: 

The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) and the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) propose to host a fall 2014 summit on implementation of standards for college and career readiness at the state level. The summit brings together key members of the Earth and Space Sciences (ESS) community to identify and devise ways in which they can work together to help states and school districts implement college and career readiness standards. A needs assessment is conducted before the summit to determine the top concerns of the stakeholders and a collaborative website is created. At the conference, a collection of standards-congruent ESS educational resources are identified and assembled. The conference report describes concrete guidelines for disseminating these resources to translate the vision and structure of the standards into teaching and learning practice.

A 2.5 day working meeting for 30 experts and stakeholders consists of short plenaries to establish the context for each set of working group sessions. The proposed plenary speakers are Steven Pruitt from Achieve, Michael Wysession, one of the lead writers of the ESS portion of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and panels of science supervisors from states that have and have not adopted the standards. In the working group sessions, conferees identify products and services that the geoscience and geoscience education community can develop to help states implement the ESS portion of the standards. A key component of the Summit is action items to move the agenda of the conference forward in the states, and commitment of the participants to follow through on the various findings of the conference is emphasized. As part of the selection process individuals will be asked for a commitment from the organizations they represent to participate in follow-up actions from the Summit. The conference and its impacts will be measured by an external evaluator

This conference is to develop a strategy for increasing the import of teaching Earth and Space Sciences in schools to make students ready for college and careers.

A Conference on Progress and Factors that Contribute to Closing the STEM Achievement Gap

The objectives of this proposed conference are to: (1) review current research on the achievement gap in mathematics and science with a focus on school-related variables that adversely affect outcomes from low-income and minority students; (2) discuss teacher quality and effective teaching in STEM; (3) identify effective strategies and models that promote equity in education and close the STEM achievement gap; and (4) build collaborative, interdisciplinary partnerships for addressing the U.S. achievement gap in STEM.

Award Number: 
1406282
Funding Period: 
Mon, 09/01/2014 to Mon, 08/31/2015
Full Description: 

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) will host a conference with a special focus on closing the achievement gap through the preparation of effective science and mathematics educators and collaborative interdisciplinary partnerships. The book "Closing the Achievement Gap from an International Perspective: Transforming STEM for an Effective Education" will be used to highlight innovative interventions other countries have implemented to address the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) achievement gap. Co-authors of the book will be invited to participate in the conference along with scientists, teacher educators, and policy makers to discuss effective strategies for closing the STEM achievement gap. The strategies will inform the future direction of educator preparation in developing effective science and mathematics educators and improving PK-12 STEM education. The objectives of this proposed conference are to: (1) review current research on the achievement gap in mathematics and science with a focus on school-related variables that adversely affect outcomes from low-income and minority students; (2) discuss teacher quality and effective teaching in STEM; (3) identify effective strategies and models that promote equity in education and close the STEM achievement gap; and (4) build collaborative, interdisciplinary partnerships for addressing the U.S. achievement gap in STEM.

Conference participants will identify social and cultural barriers that contribute to persistent education inequities and achievement gaps in STEM and discuss effective education policies and innovative initiatives that select countries have applied to promote progress in narrowing STEM achievement gaps. During the conference, a panel discussion will take a systematic view of the subject, beginning with a cross-national analysis of teacher qualifications and the achievement gap that spans 50 countries with special interest in the United States, Canada, Mexico, England, Turkey, China, Japan, Brazil, Singapore, Korea, South Africa, and Australia. Through an examination of international models of system-changing initiatives that promote gains in STEM achievement for minority and low-income populations, conference panelists will explore lessons learned and effective strategies from other countries that are potentially transferable to the American education system.

Human Subjects Protection in the Digital Age

This project will convene a panel of experts in government, industry and academia to raise and discuss emerging concerns for human subjects' protections in the digital age. This project will support scholarly discussion on human subjects' protections in the digital age with implications for funding agencies, schools, and those who work with human subjects in a variety of environments.

Lead Organization(s): 
Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1419055
Funding Period: 
Sat, 03/15/2014 to Sat, 02/28/2015
Full Description: 

This project will convene a panel of experts in government, industry and academia to raise and discuss emerging concerns for human subjects' protections in the digital age. Learners taking part in formal education, informal education, and out-of-school settings are subject to a ubiquitous tracking of their activities: locally, using the internet of things (e.g., smart phones, smart sensors and other cyberphysical devices), and globally, via the internet. This tracking may include data tracked passively (e.g., online purchases) or data made available on social media websites by the learners themselves. In addition, the use of the longitudinal data collected by local educational agencies for research is an increasingly political concern. Decisions about the use of these data by university researchers and scholars are typically made by Institutional Review Board (IRB) offices. New guidelines on IRB practices are being considered by a number of bodies, including the National Research Council, which issued a report in early 2014.

This project will support scholarly discussion on human subjects' protections in the digital age with implications for funding agencies, schools, and those who work with human subjects in a variety of environments. The issues discussed are of national import, including, but not limited to FERPA privacy concerns. To the extent that US researchers work with data from other countries (e.g., via massive open online courses or MOOCs), the impact of the reports that will be produced as part of this conference for education research is potentially global.

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