Video

STEM for All Collaboratory: Accelerating Dissemination and Fostering Collaborations for STEM Educational Research and Development

This project will capitalize on the STEM for All Video Showcase and extend its impact by creating a STEM for All Multiplex. The Multiplex will draw on past and future Video Showcase videos to create a multimedia environment for professional and public exchange, as well as to provide a way for anyone to search the growing database of videos, create thematic playlists, and re-use the content in new educational and research contexts.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1922641
Funding Period: 
Sun, 09/01/2019 to Wed, 08/31/2022
Full Description: 

The STEM for All Collaboratory will advance educational research and development through the creation and facilitation of two related and interactive platforms: the STEM for All Video Showcase, and the STEM for All Multiplex. The Video Showcase provides an annual, online, week-long, interactive event where hundreds of educational researchers and developers create, share, and discuss 3-minute videos of their federally funded work to improve Science, Mathematics, Engineering, Technology and Computer Science education. Several years of successful Video Showcases have contributed to a rich database of videos showcasing innovative approaches to STEM education. To capitalize on the growing resource and extend its impact, this project will create a STEM for All Multiplex, a unique contribution to STEM education. The Multiplex will draw on past and future Video Showcase videos to create a multimedia environment for professional and public exchange, as well as to provide a way for anyone to search the growing database of videos, create thematic playlists, and re-use the content in new educational and research contexts. The Multiplex will host interactive, monthly, thematic online events related to emerging research and practices to improve STEM and Computer Science education in formal and informal environments. Each thematic event will include selected video presentations, expert panels, resources, interactive discussions and a synthesis of lessons learned. All events will be accessible and open to the public. The project will continue to host and facilitate the annual Video Showcase event which has attracted over 70,000 people from over 180 countries over the course of a year. This effort will be guided by a collaboration with NSF resource centers, learning networks, and STEM professional organizations, and will advance the STEM research and education missions of the 11 collaborating organizations.

The Video Showcase and the Multiplex will foster increased dissemination of federally funded work and will effectively share NSF's investments aimed at improving STEM education. It will enable presenters to learn with and from each other, offering and receiving feedback, critique, and queries that will improve work in progress and to facilitate new collaborations for educational research. It will connect researchers with practitioners, enabling both groups to benefit from each other's knowledge and perspective. Further, it will connect seasoned investigators with aspiring investigators from diverse backgrounds, including those from Minority Serving Institutions. It will thereby enable new researchers to broaden their knowledge of currently funded efforts while also providing them with the opportunity to discuss resources, methodology and impact measures with the investigators. Hence, the project has the potential to broaden the future pool of investigators in STEM educational research. This work will further contribute to the STEM education field through its research on the ways that this multimedia environment can improve currently funded projects, catalyze new efforts and collaborations, build the capacity of emerging diverse leadership, and connect research and practice.

Developing and Investigating Unscripted Mathematics Videos

This project will use an alternative model for online videos to develop video units that feature the unscripted dialogue of pairs of students. The project team will create a repository of 6 dialogic mathematics video units that target important Algebra 1 and 2 topics for high school and upper middle school students, though the approach can be applied to any STEM topic, for any age level.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1907782
Funding Period: 
Sun, 09/01/2019 to Thu, 08/31/2023
Full Description: 

This project responds to the recent internet phenomenon of widespread accessibility to online instructional videos, which offer many benefits, such as student control of the pace of learning. However, these videos primarily focus on a single speaker working through procedural problems and providing an explanation. While the immense reach of free online instructional videos is potentially transformative, this potential can only be attained if access transcends physical availability to also include entry into important disciplinary understandings and practices, and only if the instructional method pushes past what would be considered outdated pedagogy in any other setting than a digital one. This project will use an alternative model for online videos, originally developed for a previous exploratory project, to develop 6 video units that feature the unscripted dialogue of pairs of students. The project team will use the filming and post-production processes established during the previous grant to create a repository of 6 dialogic mathematics video units that target important Algebra 1 and 2 topics for high school and upper middle school students, though the approach can be applied to any STEM topic, for any age level. They will also conduct 8 research studies to investigate the promise of these unscripted dialogic videos with a diverse population to better understand the vicarious learning process, which refers to learning from video- or audio-taped presentations of other people learning. Additionally, the project team will provide broader access to the project videos and support a variety of users, by: (a) subtitling the videos and checking math task statements for linguistic accessibility; (b) representing diversity of race, ethnicity, and language in both the pool of students who appear in the videos and the research study participants; (c) providing teachers with an array of resources including focus questions to pose in class with each video, printable task worksheets, specific ways to support dialogue about the videos, and alignment of the video content with Common Core mathematics standards and practices; and (d) modernizing the project website and making it functional across a variety of platforms.

The videos created for this project will feature pairs of students (called the talent), highlighting their unscripted dialogue, authentic confusion, and conceptual resources. Each video unit will consist of 7 video lessons (each split into 4-5 short video episodes) meant to be viewed in succession to support conceptual development over time. The project will build upon emerging evidence from the exploratory grant that as students engage with videos that feature peers grappling with complex mathematics, they can enter a quasi-collaborative relationship with the on-screen talent to learn complex conceptual content and engage in authentic mathematical practices. The research focuses on the questions: 1. What can diverse populations of vicarious learners learn mathematically from dialogic videos, and how do the vicarious learners orient to the talent in the videos? 2. What is the nature of vicarious learners' evolving ways of reasoning as they engage with multiple dialogic video lessons over time and what processes are involved in vicarious learning? and, 3. What instructional practices encourage a classroom community to adopt productive ways of reasoning from dialogic videos? To address the first question, the project team will conduct two Learning Outcomes and Orientation Studies, in which they analyze students' learning outcomes and survey responses after they have learned from one of the video units in a classroom setting. Before administering an assessment to a classroom of students, they will first conduct an exploratory Interpretation Study for each unit, in which they link the mathematical interpretations that VLs generate from viewing the project videos with their performance on an assessment instrument. Both types of studies will be conducted twice, once for each of two video units - Exponential Functions and Meaning and Use of Algebraic Symbols. For the second research question, the project team will identify a learning trajectory associated with each of four video units. These two learning trajectories will inform the instructional planning for the classroom studies by identifying what meaningful appropriation can occur, as well as conceptual challenges for VLs. By delivering learning trajectories for two additional units, the project can contribute to vicarious learning theory by identifying commonalities in learning processes evident across the four studies. For the final research question, the project team will investigate how instructors can support students with the instrumental genesis process, which occurs through a process called instrumental orchestration, as they teach the two videos on exponential functions and algebraic symbols.

Supporting Instructional Growth in Mathematics: Enhancing Urban Secondary Teachers' Professional Learning through Formative Feedback

This project will explore the potential of video-based formative feedback to enhance professional development around ambitious instruction for secondary teachers in urban schools.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1620920
Funding Period: 
Thu, 09/15/2016 to Mon, 08/31/2020
Full Description: 

Research continues to show the benefits of ambitious instruction for student learning of mathematics, yet ambitious instruction continues to be rare in U.S. schools, particularly in schools that serve historically marginalized students. Secondary teachers' learning and enactment of ambitious instruction in mathematics requires conceptual change, and their development could benefit from adequate and timely feedback close to classroom instruction. For this reason, the project will explore the potential of video-based formative feedback to enhance professional development. The focus of the partnership between university researchers and a well-regarded professional development organization, Math for America Los Angeles (MfA LA) will be on career-long learning of secondary mathematics teachers in urban schools. Results from this project will provide a theory of mathematics teachers' learning that can inform other instructional improvement efforts, with ecological validity in the critical site of urban schools. The framework and theory will be detailed at the level of specific tools and concrete practices that are learnable by teachers, school leaders, or instructional coaches. This project is funded by the Discovery Research Pre-K-12 Program, which funds research and development of STEM innovations and approaches in assessment, teaching and learning.

The question the project will address is: How can the project use formative feedback to enhance mathematics teachers' professional learning environments that support their development of ambitious instruction in urban schools? Formative feedback refers to tools and processes that ascertain teachers' current understandings and responsively adapt learning activities to better guide them toward their learning goals. Professional learning environments refer to the multiple sites of teachers' learning, from formal professional development activities to their school workplace. Ambitious instruction is defined as teaching approaches that aim to provide all students with ample opportunities to develop conceptual understanding of key mathematical ideas, participate in mathematical argumentation, connect multiple mathematical representations, as well as become fluent with mathematical procedures and processes. The persistence of typical mathematics instruction is framed as, in large part, an issue of teacher learning. Using design-based implementation research and interpretive methods, the project team will co-develop video-based formative assessment processes to guide teachers' evolving classroom practice.

Synchronous Online Professional Learning Experiences for Middle Grades Mathematics Teachers in Rural Contexts

This project will develop and implement an innovative online mathematics professional development model designed to provide growth opportunities for teachers in rural districts who normally lack access to such opportunities. The project will focus on developing teacher capacity to enact ambitious, responsive instruction aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), and thus will be sustained, interactive, and of sufficient duration to help teachers transform their practices.

Lead Organization(s): 
Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1620911
Funding Period: 
Thu, 09/01/2016 to Mon, 08/31/2020
Full Description: 

All teachers need access to high quality professional development in order to meet the needs of students and teach mathematics as outlined in college and career-ready standards. Online professional development has the potential to expand access to under-resourced areas, including urban districts, and teachers who wish to participate in communities of inquiry but do not have local access to such communities. Building on research on effective face-to-face professional development, including research from the emerging fields of content-focused coaching and video coaching, this project will design and study professional development for middle grades mathematics teachers in rural communities. As schools turn to digital learning contexts, it is inevitable that professional development will follow a similar trend. It is imperative to have research-based models that demonstrate how the features of high-quality face-to-face professional development can be matched or augmented in online contexts. The study has the potential to contribute to research on professional development, especially in the growing areas of online professional development and coaching, and will build from and contribute to the literature on the impact of multiple modalities and synchronicities in online contexts. The project will address the critical need for models of professional development for teachers in rural areas, which has a limited research base. This project is funded by the Discovery Research PreK-12 (DRK-12) Program. The DRK-12 program supports research and development on STEM education innovations and approaches to teaching, learning, and assessment.

The project will develop and implement an innovative online mathematics professional development model designed to provide growth opportunities for teachers in rural districts who normally lack access to such opportunities. The study will take place in two geographically disparate locations in order to research the effectiveness of the model across contexts and to explore the resources and constraints involved in scaling up the model. The project will focus on developing teacher capacity to enact ambitious, responsive instruction aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), and thus will be sustained, interactive, and of sufficient duration to help teachers transform their practices. In the design of the professional development, the project will leverage features of emerging technologies that are multimodal and involve a mix of synchronous/ asynchronous communication. The most innovative feature is the online video coaching in which a teacher and coach separately will view and notate video of the teacher's enactment of a collaboratively planned lesson as a precursor to the online post-lesson debriefing. Building from design-based research principles, the project will incorporate iterative cycles of data collection, analysis, reflection, and revision that will explore the effectiveness of the model and inform revisions.


Project Videos

2019 STEM for All Video Showcase

Title: Synchronous Online Professional Development Model

Presenter(s): Jeffrey Choppin, Julie Amador, Cynthia Carson, Ryan Gillespie, Stephanie Martin, & Kristana Textor


Supports for Elementary Teachers Implementing the NGSS: Challenges and Opportunities across Science, Technology, and Engineering

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Fri

Consider methods and challenges associated with supporting upper elementary teachers’ implementation of NGSS-based classroom interventions in this structured poster session.

Date/Time: 
9:15 am to 10:45 am
Session Materials: 

In this structured poster session, a set of projects will present and discuss resources, models, and tools (RMTs) designed to support upper elementary teachers to implement an array of curricular and instructional interventions reflecting diverse disciplinary concepts and practices embodied in NGSS. The session aims to provide a forum for exploring diverse approaches to improving science in 3rd-5th-grade classrooms and engage in discussion about how these ideas can advance systemic efforts to support quality science instruction and student learning. 

Session Types: 

The Question of Dissemination: Using Video to Draw Broader Audiences to NSF Research

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Thu

Consider the role project videos can play in dissemination of research with OSPrI describing their video experience, and NSF situating the work within their efforts to improve policymakers’ understanding of DR K–12 research and development.

Date/Time: 
2:15 pm to 3:45 pm
Session Materials: 

A challenge for researchers and federal research funding institutions in the 21st century is how to get the word out on how research is pertinent and being used in by the field. According to Neild (2016, p1):

Session Types: 

Strategies for Leading Classroom Discussions Aimed at Core Ideas and Scientific Modeling Practices

This project will use video case studies to identify key strategies used by exemplary teachers to guide class discussions. The project will study teachers in the areas of high school mechanics and electricity, and middle school life sciences, and is designed to develop the constructs and language that will enable us to describe key discussion leading strategies.

Award Number: 
1503456
Funding Period: 
Sat, 08/01/2015 to Tue, 07/31/2018
Full Description: 

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have set goals for students to learn scientific models as disciplinary core ideas in addition to scientific reasoning practices and cross cutting ideas. Given these advances in national standards, educators are now asking for details about: (a) strategies for teaching the core disciplinary ideas; (b) how to teach the components of scientific thinking practices; and (c) how to integrate those practices with the teaching of core ideas. This project will use video case studies to identify key strategies used by exemplary teachers to guide class discussions toward these goals. The project will study teachers in the areas of high school mechanics and electricity, and middle school life sciences, and is designed to develop the constructs and language that will enable us to describe key discussion leading strategies. Clarified descriptions of the strategies will be disseminated to teachers via a website on discussion leading strategies for building models as core ideas, and accompanied by real classroom examples.

In order to organize the strategies, the project will also combine the results of the classroom case studies with findings from studies of thinking processes in scientists to develop an integrated theoretical framework for model based learning and teaching in science. The theoretical framework will serve as a guide for organizing instruction, integrating research findings, and sequencing strategies for teacher educators and curriculum developers. The framework will start from practices in the NGSS standards for modeling and add detail by identifying smaller practices and supporting teaching strategies at four different time scale levels--from 5-second engagements with mental simulations, to the use of minutes-long constructive reasoning processes, to larger modeling cycles lasting roughly 10 minutes to hours, to model construction modes that can last 15 minutes to days. A simplified version of the theoretical framework will give a way to introduce teachers to strategies in an organized manner, one level at a time. The Discovery Research K-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools (RMTs). Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects.

CAREER: Leveraging Contrasting Cases to Investigate Integer Understanding

Most students learn about negative numbers long after they have learned about positive numbers, and they have little time or opportunity to build on their prior understanding by contrasting the two concepts. The purpose of this CAREER project is to identify language factors and instructional sequences that contribute to improving elementary students' understanding of addition and subtraction problems involving negative integers. 

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1350281
Funding Period: 
Thu, 05/15/2014 to Tue, 04/30/2019
Full Description: 

Currently, most students learn about negative numbers long after they have learned about positive numbers, and they have little time or opportunity to build on their prior understanding by contrasting the two concepts. Therefore, they struggle to make sense of negative integer concepts, which appear to conflict with their current understanding. The purpose of this CAREER project is to identify language factors and instructional sequences that contribute to improving elementary students' understanding of addition and subtraction problems involving negative integers. A second objective is to identify how elementary teachers interpret their students' integer understanding and use research findings to support their teaching of these concepts. This project is expected to contribute to theories regarding the development of integer understanding as well as what makes a useful contrasting case when learning new, related concepts. Moreover, the results of this project can contribute to our understanding of how to build on students? prior number knowledge rather than contradict it.

The principal investigator will conduct a series of four experimental studies involving a preparation for learning component with students randomly assigned to treatment or control groups. Study 1 will involve second and fourth graders and will test the language factors that support students' understanding of integers. Studies 2-4 will involve second and fifth graders and will test the optimal order in which integer addition and subtraction problems are presented in contrast with each other versus sequentially without contrasts. Using items that measure students? understanding of integers and integer operations, the PI will compare students' gains from pre-tests to post-tests between groups. Further, the investigator will qualitatively code students? solution strategies based on follow-up interviews and written work for additional information on the differences between groups. Following the experimental studies, the PI will work with elementary teachers over three lesson study cycles, during which teachers will implement instruction based on the prior studies? results. The PI will compare the performance of students who participate in the lesson study unit versus control classrooms to measure impact of the unit.

Videos of the lesson study unit, as well as the negative integer lesson plans will be made available for other teachers and teacher educators to use. Further, the investigator will incorporate the research results into an undergraduate mathematics methods course. To ensure that the results of this research reach a wider audience, the investigator will create an integer game and storybook, illustrating key concepts identified through the research, that parents can explore together with their children during family math nights and at home. On a broader scale, this project has the potential to illuminate ways to develop more coherence in the sequencing of mathematics topics to more effectively build on students? current understanding.

CAREER: Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

The goal of this CAREER program of research is to identify, from a cross-cultural perspective, essential Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching (AKT) that will enable elementary teachers to better develop students' algebraic thinking. This study explores AKT based on integrated insights of the U.S. and Chinese expert teachers' classroom performance.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1350068
Funding Period: 
Fri, 08/15/2014 to Wed, 07/31/2019
Full Description: 

What content knowledge is needed for the teaching of mathematics? What practices are more effective for realizing student success? These questions have received considerable attention in the mathematics education community. The goal of this CAREER program of research is to identify, from a cross-cultural perspective, essential Algebraic Knowledge for Teaching (AKT) that will enable elementary teachers to better develop students' algebraic thinking. Focusing on two fundamental mathematical ideas recently emphasized by the Common Core State Standards - inverse relations and properties of operations - this study explores AKT based on integrated insights of the U.S. and Chinese expert teachers' classroom performance. It will be focused on three objectives: (1) identify AKT that facilitates algebraic thinking and develop preliminary findings into teaching materials; (2) refine research-based teaching materials based on the evaluative data; and (3) integrate research with education through course development at Temple University and teacher outreach in Philadelphia.

The model underlying this research program is that improved pedagogy will improve student learning, both directly and indirectly. A design-based research method will be used to accomplish objectives #1 and #2. Cross-cultural videotaped lessons will be first analyzed to identify AKT, focusing on teachers' use of worked examples, representations, and deep questions. This initial set of findings will then be developed into teaching materials. The U.S. and Chinese expert teachers will re-teach the lessons as part of the refinement process. Data sources will include: baseline and updated survey data (control, context, and process variables), observation, documents, videos, and interviews. The statistical techniques will include descriptive and inferential statistics and HLM will to address the hierarchical nature of the data.

This project involves students and teachers at various levels (elementary, undergraduate, and graduate) at Temple University and the School District of Philadelphia (SDP) in the U.S. and Nanjing Normal University and Nantong School District in China. A total of 600 current and future elementary teachers and many of their students will benefit directly or indirectly from this project. Project findings will be disseminated through various venues. Activities of the project will promote school district-university collaboration, a novice-expert teacher network, and cross-disciplinary and international collaboration. It is anticipated that the videos of expert teaching will also be useful future research by cognitive researchers studying ways to improve mathematics learning.

Publications
G indicates graduate student author; U indicates undergraduate student author

Journal Articles in English

  1. Ding, M., G Chen, W., & G Hassler, R. (2019). Linear quantity models in the US and Chinese elementary mathematics classrooms. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 21, 105-130 doi: 10.1080/10986065.2019.1570834 . PDF
  2. Barnett, E., & Ding, M. (2019). Teaching of the associative property: A natural classroom investigation. Investigations of Mathematics Learning, 11, 148-166. doi: 10.1080/19477503.2018.1425592  PDF
  3. Ding, M., & G Heffernan, K. (2018). Transferring specialized content knowledge to elementary classrooms: Preservice teachers’ learning to teach the associative property. International Journal of Mathematics Educational in Science and Technology, 49, 899-921.doi: 10.1080/0020739X.2018.1426793 PDF
  4. Ding, M. (2018). Modeling with tape diagrams. Teaching Children Mathematics25, 158-165. doi: 10.5951/teacchilmath.25.3.0158  PDF
  5. G Chen, W., & Ding, M.* (2018). Transitioning from mathematics textbook to classroom instruction: The case of a Chinese expert teacher. Frontiers of Education in China, 13, 601-632. doi: 10.1007/s11516-018-0031-z (*Both authors contributed equally). PDF
  6. Ding, M., & G Auxter, A. (2017). Children’s strategies to solving additive inverse problems: A preliminary analysis. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 29, 73-92. doi:10.1007/s13394-017-0188-4  PDF
  7. Ding, M. (2016).  Developing preservice elementary teachers’ specialized content knowledge for teaching fundamental mathematical ideas: The case of associative property. International Journal of STEM Education, 3(9), 1-19doi: 10.1186/s40594-016-0041-4  PDF
  8. Ding, M. (2016). Opportunities to learn: Inverse operations in U.S. and Chinese elementary mathematics textbooks. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 18, 45-68. doi: 10.1080/10986065.2016.1107819  PDF

Journal Articles in Chinese
Note: The Chinese journals Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction教育研究与评论 (小学教育教学) and Curriculum and Instructional Methods (课程教材教法) are both official, core journals in mathematics education field in China.

  1. Chen, W. (2018). Strategies to deal with mathematical representations – an analysis of expert’s classroom instruction. Curriculum and Instructional Methods. 数学教学的表征处理策略——基于专家教师的课堂教学分析. 课程教材教法. PDF
  2. Ma, F. ( 2018) – Necessary algebraic knowledge for elementary teachers- an ongoing cross-cultural study. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 5-7.  小学教师必备的代数学科知识-跨文化研究进行时。教育研究与评论 (小学教育教学), 2, 5-7. PDF
  3. Chen, J. (2018) Infusion and development of children’s early algebraic thinking – a comparative study of the US and Chinese elementary mathematics teaching. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 8-13.  儿童早期代数思维的渗透与培养-中美小学数学教学比较研究。教育研究与评论(小学教育教学),28-13.  PDF
  4. Zong, L. (2018). A comparative study on the infusion of inverse relations in the US and Chinese classroom teaching. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 14-19.  中美逆运算渗透教学对比研究。教育研究与评论(小学教育教学,2,14-19.  PDF
  5. Wu, X. (2018). Mathematical representations and development of children’s mathematical thinking: A perspective of US-Chinese comparison. Educational Research and Evaluation (Elementary Education and Instruction), 2, 20-24.  数学表征与儿童数学思维发展-基于中美比较视角。教育研究与评论(小学教育教学,2, 20-24.  PDF

Dissertations

  1. Hassler, R. (2016). Mathematical comprehension facilitated by situation models: Learning opportunities for inverse relations in elementary school.Published dissertation, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. (Chair: Dr. Meixia Ding)  PDF
  2. Chen, W. (2018). Elementary mathematics teachers’ professional growth: A perspectives of TPACK (TPACK 视角下小学数学教师专业发展的研究). Dissertation, Nanjing Normal University. Nanjing, China. PDF

National Presentations
G indicates graduate student author; U indicates undergraduate student author

  • Ding, M (symposium organizer, 2019, April). Enhancing elementary mathematics instruction: A U.S.-China collaboration. Papers presented at NCTM research conference (Discussant: Jinfa Cai). (The following three action research papers were written by my NSF project teachers under my guidance).
      • Milewski Moskal, M., & Varano, A. (2019). The teaching of worked examples: Chinese approaches in U.S. classrooms. Paper 
      • Larese, T., Milewski Moskal, M., Ottinger, M., & Varano, A., (2019). Introducing Investigations math games in China: Successes and surprises. Paper
      • Murray, D., Seidman, J., Blackmon, E., Maimon, G., & Domsky, A. (2019). Mathematic instruction across two cultures: A teacher perspective. Paper
    • Ding, M., & Ying Y. (2018, June). CAREER: Algebraic knowledge for teaching: A cross-cultural perspective. Poster presentation at the National Science Foundation (NSF) PI meeting, Washington, DC.  Poster
    • Ding, M., Brynes, J., G Barnett, E., & Hassler, R. (2018, April). When classroom instruction predicts students’ learning of early algebra: A cross-cultural opportunity-propensity analysis. Paper presented at 2018 AERA conference. New York, NY.  Paper
    • Ding, M., Li, X., Manfredonia, M., & Luo, W. (2018, April). Video as a tool to support teacher learning: A Cross-cultural analysis. Paper presented at 2018 NCTM conference. Washington, DC.  PPT
    • GBarnett, E., & Ding, M. (2018, April). Teaching the basic properties of arithmetic: A natural classroom investigation of associativity. Poster presentation at 2018AERA conference, New York, NY.  Poster
    • Hassler, R., & Ding, M. (2018, April). The role of deep questions in promoting elementary students’ mathematical comprehension. Poster presentation at 2018AERA conference, New York, NY.
    • Ding, M., G Chen, W., G Hassler, R., Li, X., & G Barnett, E. (April, 2017). Comparisons in the US and Chinese elementary mathematics classrooms. Poster presentation at AERA 2017 conference (In the session of “Advancing Mathematics Education Through NSF’s DRK-12 Program”). San Antonio, TX. Poster
    • Ding, M., Li, X., G Hassler, R., & G Barnett, E. (April, 2017). Understanding the basic properties of operations in US and Chinese elementary School. Paper presented at AERA 2017 conference. San Antonio, TX.  Paper
    • Ding, M., G Chen, W., & G Hassler, R. (April, 2017). Tape diagrams in the US and Chinese elementary mathematics classrooms. Paper presented at NCTM 2017 conference. San Antonio, TX.  Paper
    • Ding, M., & G Hassler, R. (2016, June). CAREER: Algebraic knowledge for teaching in elementary school: A cross-cultural perspective. Poster presentation at the NSF PI meeting, Washington, DC. Poster
    • Ding, M. (symposium organizer, 2016, April). Early algebraic in elementary school: A cross-cultural perspective. Proposals presented at 2016 AERA conference, Washington, DC.
        • Ding, M. (2016, April). A comparative analysis of inverse operations in U.S. and Chinese elementary mathematics textbooks. Paper 
        • G Hassler, R. (2016, April). Elementary Textbooks to Classroom Teaching: A Situation Model Perspective. Paper
        • G Chen, W., & Ding, M. (2016, April). Transitioning textbooks into classroom teaching: An action research on Chinese elementary mathematics lessons. Paper
        • Li, X., G Hassler, R., & Ding, M. (2016, April). Elementary students’ understanding of inverse relations in the U.S. and China.  Paper
        • Stull, J., Ding, M., G Hassler, R., Li, X., & U George, C. (2016, April). The impact of algebraic knowledge for teaching on student learning: A Preliminary analysis. Paper
      • Ding, M., G Hassler, R., Li., X., & G Chen, W. (2016, April). Algebraic knowledge for teaching: An analysis of US experts' lessons on inverse relations. Paper presented at 2016 NCTM conference, San Francisco, CA. Paper
      • G Hassler. R., & Ding, M. (2016, April). Situation model perspective on mathematics classroom teaching: A case study on inverse relations. Paper presented at 2016 NCTM conference, San Francisco, CA.  Paper
      • Ding, M., & G Copeland, K. (2015, April). Transforming specialized content knowledge: Preservice elementary teachers’ learning to teach the associative property of multiplication. Paper presented at AERA 2015 conference, Chicago, IL. Paper PPT
      • Ding, M., & G Auxter, A. (2015, April). Children’s strategies to solving additive inverse problems: A preliminary analysis. Paper presented at AERA 2015 conference, Chicago, IL.  Paper

      Re-Imagining Video-based Online Learning

      Despite the tremendous growth in the availability of mathematics videos online, little research has investigated student learning from them. The goal of this exploratory project is to create, investigate, and provide evidence of promise for a model of online videos that embodies a more expansive vision of both the nature of the content and the pedagogical approach than is currently represented in YouTube-style lessons.

      Award Number: 
      1416789
      Funding Period: 
      Mon, 09/01/2014 to Fri, 08/31/2018
      Full Description: 

      The goal of this exploratory project is to create, investigate, and provide evidence of promise for a model of online videos that embodies a more expansive vision of both the nature of the content and the pedagogical approach than is currently represented in YouTube-style lessons. This goal is pursued through the development and research of videos for two mathematics units--one focused on proportional reasoning at the middle grades level and the other focused on quadratic functions at the high school level, using an approach that could be applied to any STEM content area. The media attention on the Khan Academy and the wide array of massive open online courses has highlighted the internet phenomenon of widespread accessibility to mathematics lessons, which offer many benefits, such as student control of the pace of learning and earlier access to advanced topics than is often possible in public schools. Yet, despite the huge range of topics presented in online videos, there is surprising uniformity in the procedural emphasis of the content and in the expository mode of presentation. Moving beyond the types of videos now used, primarily recorded lectures that replicate traditional classroom experience, this project advances our understanding about how students learn from video and from watching others learn - vicarious learning - as opposed to watching an expert. This project addresses the need for an alternative approach. Rather than relying on an expository style, the videos produced for this project focus on pairs of students, highlighting their dialogue, explanations and alternative conceptions. This alternative has the potential to contribute to learning sciences and to develop a usable tool.

      Despite the tremendous growth in the availability of mathematics videos online, little research has investigated student learning from them. This project develops dialogue-intensive videos in which children justify and explain their reasoning, elucidate their own comprehension of mathematical situations, and argue for and against various ideas and strategies. According to Wegerif (2007), such vicarious participation in a dialogic community may help learners take the perspective of another in a discussion, thus "expanding the spaces of learning" through digital technology. Consequently, a major contribution of this proposed work will be a set of four vicarious learning studies. Two qualitative studies investigate the particular meanings and ways of reasoning that learners appropriate from observing the dialogue of the students in the videos, as well as the learning trajectories of vicarious learners for each unit. Two quantitative studies isolate and test the effectiveness of the dialogic and the conceptual components of the model by comparing learning outcome gains for (a) conceptual dialogic versus conceptual expository conditions, and (b) dialogic conceptual versus dialogic procedural conditions. Another mark of the originality of the proposed work is the set of vicarious learning studies that contributes to the emerging literature across several dimensions, by (a) using secondary students rather than undergraduates; (b) exploring longer periods of learning, which is more conducive to deeper understanding; and (c) examining the nature of reasoning that is possible, not just the effectiveness of the approach.

      Pages

      Subscribe to Video