Video

Conceptions and Consequences of Mathematical Argumentation, Justification, and Proof

This book aims to advance ongoing debates in the field of mathematics and mathematics education regarding conceptions of argumentation, justification, and proof and the consequences for research and practice when applying particular conceptions of each construct. Through analyses of classroom practice across grade levels using different lenses - particular conceptions of argumentation, justification, and proof - researchers consider the implications of how each conception shapes empirical outcomes.

Author/Presenter

Kristen N. Bieda,
AnnaMarie Conner,
Karl W. Kosko,
Megan Staples

AnnaMarie Conner

Karl W. Kosko

Megan Staples

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2020
Short Description

This book aims to advance ongoing debates in the field of mathematics and mathematics education regarding conceptions of argumentation, justification, and proof and the consequences for research and practice when applying particular conceptions of each construct. Through analyses of classroom practice across grade levels using different lenses - particular conceptions of argumentation, justification, and proof - researchers consider the implications of how each conception shapes empirical outcomes. In each section, organized by grade band, authors adopt particular conceptions of argumentation, justification, and proof, and they analyse one data set from each perspective. In addition, each section includes a synthesis chapter from an expert in the field to bring to the fore potential implications, as well as new questions, raised by the analyses. Finally, a culminating section considers the use of each conception across grade bands and data sets.

“Well That's How the Kids Feel!”—Epistemic Empathy as a Driver of Responsive Teaching

While research shows that responsive teaching fosters students' disciplinary learning and equitable opportunities for participation, there is yet much to know about how teachers come to be responsive to their students' experiences in the science classroom. In this work, we set out to examine whether and how engaging teachers as learners in doing science may support responsive instructional practices.

Author/Presenter

Lama Z. Jaber

Vesal Dini

David Hammer

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2021
Short Description

In this article, the authors present evidence from teachers' reflections that this stability was supported by the teachers' intellectual and emotional experiences as learners. Specifically, they argue that engaging in extended scientific inquiry provided a basis for the teachers having epistemic empathy for their students—their tuning into and appreciating their students' intellectual and emotional experiences in science, which in turn supported teachers' responsiveness in the classroom.

Cognitive Instructional Principles in Elementary Mathematics Classrooms: A Case of Teaching Inverse Relations

Instructional principles gleaned from cognitive science play a critical role in improving classroom teaching. This study examines how three cognitive instructional principles including worked examples, representations, and deep questions are used in eight experienced elementary teachers’ early algebra lessons in the U.S. Based on the analysis of 32 videotaped lessons of inverse relations, we found that most teachers spent sufficient class time on worked examples; however, some lessons included repetitive examples that also included irrelevant practice problems.

Author/Presenter

Meixia Ding

Ryan Hassler

Xiaobao Li

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2020
Short Description

This study examines how three cognitive instructional principles including worked examples, representations, and deep questions are used in eight experienced elementary teachers’ early algebra lessons in the U.S.

Situating Presence Within Extended Reality for Teacher Training: Validation of the eXtended Reality Presence Scale (XRPS) in Preservice Teacher Use of Immersive 360 Video

The use of video is commonplace for professional preparation in education and other fields. Research has provided evidence that the use of video in these contexts can lead to increased noticing and reflection. However, educators now have access to evolving forms of video such as 360 video. The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate an instrument for assessing immersive 360 video use in an undergraduate preservice teacher university training program.

Author/Presenter

Enrico Gandolfi

Karl W. Kosko

Richard E. Ferdig

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2020
Short Description

The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate an instrument for assessing immersive 360 video use in an undergraduate preservice teacher university training program.

Effect and Influence of Ambisonic Audio in Viewing 360 Video

Research has provided evidence of the value of producing multiple representationsof content for learners (e.g., verbal, visual, etc.). However, much of the research has acknowledged changes in visual technologies while not recognizing or utilizing related audio innovations. For instance, teacher education students who were once taught through two-dimensional video are now being presented with interactive, three-dimensional content (e.g., simulations or 360 video). Users in old and new formats, however, still typically receive monophonic sound.

Author/Presenter

Richard E. Ferdig

Karl W. Kosko

Enrico Gandolfi

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2020
Short Description

Research has provided evidence of the value of producing multiple representationsof content for learners (e.g., verbal, visual, etc.). However, much of the research has acknowledged changes in visual technologies while not recognizing or utilizing related audio innovations. The purpose of this study was to respond to this gap by comparing the outcomes of watching 360 video with either monophonic or ambisonic audio.

Using Authentic Video Clips of Classroom Instruction to Capture Teachers’ Moment-to-Moment Perceiving as Knowledge-Filtered Noticing

In this article, we report on the development of a novel, video-based measure of teachers’ moment-to-moment noticing as knowledge-filtered perception. We developed items to capture teachers’ perception of similarity of their own teaching to the teaching shown in three short video clips of authentic classroom instruction. We describe the item design and relate teachers’ moment-to-moment noticing to their reflective noticing as measured by judgements of similarity teachers provided after viewing each video.

Author/Presenter

Nicole B. Kersting

James E. Smith

Beau Vezino

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2021
Short Description

This article reports on the development of a novel, video-based measure of teachers’ moment-to-moment noticing as knowledge-filtered perception.

Teacher Voices from an Online Elementary Mathematics Community: Examining Perceptions of Professional Learning

This study compares web usage data with interviews from 41 participants, who are members of an online professional development site called the Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community (VLC), to explore how elementary school teachers learn from classroom video. Web usage data reveal that the commentary surrounding video posted to the VLC is sparse and surface level, possibly indicating a lack of serious attention to the videos. Interview data, however, indicate that participants felt they learned from this resource.

Author/Presenter

Shereen Oca Beilstein

Genevieve M. Henricks

Victoria Jay

Michelle Perry

Meg Schleppenbach Bates

Cheryl G. Moran

Joseph Robinson Cimpian

Year
2020
Short Description

This study compares web usage data with interviews from 41 participants, who are members of an online professional development site called the Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community (VLC), to explore how elementary school teachers learn from classroom video.

Fostering Video Sharing and Discourse Among STEM Educational Researchers in a Multimodal Environment

Multimedia environments provide multiple resources for expression, collaboration, and knowledge-creation. Yet there is much to be learned about the design of such environments, the forms of collegial discourse that take place, and the benefits of participation. To this end, we study the 2017 STEM for All Video Showcase, a multimodal environment, that enabled educational researchers to share and discuss short videos depicting their federally-funded work to improve STEM education.

Author/Presenter

Joni Falk

Debra Bernstein

Brian Drayton

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2019
Short Description

This article looks at the 2017 STEM for All Video Showcase, a multimodal environment, that enabled educational researchers to share and discuss short videos depicting their federally-funded work to improve STEM education. In a mixed methods study, authors investigate the forms of participation that took place and the benefits that accrued to those who presented.

The Impact of Multimedia Educative Curriculum Materials (MECMs) on Teachers' Beliefs about Scientific Argumentation

Recent reform efforts in science education include a focus on science practices. Teachers require support in integrating these practices into instruction. Multimedia educative curriculum materials (MECMs), digital materials explicitly designed to support teacher learning, offer one potential resource for this critical need. Consequently, the authors investigated how teachers used MECMs and whether that use impacted their beliefs about the practice of scientific argumentation. They conducted a randomised experimental study with 90 middle school science teachers in the USA.

Author/Presenter

Suzanna Loper

Katherine L. McNeill

María González-Howard

Lisa M. Marco-Bujosa

Laura M. O’Dwyer

Year
2019
Short Description

Authors discuss how teachers used MECMs and whether that use impacted their beliefs about the practice of scientific argumentation.

How Viewers Orient Toward Student Dialogue in Online Math Videos

Online math videos for student learning are abundant; yet they are surprisingly uniform in their monologic, expository mode of presentation and their emphasis on procedural skill. In response, we created an alternative model of online math videos that feature the unscripted dialogue of secondary school students, who convey sources of confusion and resolve the dilemmas that arise during problem solving.

Author/Presenter

Joanne Lobato

Carren Walker

Lead Organization(s)
Year
2019
Short Description

Authors describe an alternative model of online math videos that feature unscripted dialogue of secondary school students, who convey sources of confusion and resolve the dilemmas that arise during problem solving.