Login

Graduate

Centers for Learning and Teaching: Research to Identify Changes in Mathematics Education Doctoral Preparation and the Production of New Doctorates

This project will research the programmatic changes that resulted from the NSF investment in Centers for Learning and Teaching of Mathematics (CLT) at the 31 participating institutions. It will provide information on the core elements of doctoral preparation in mathematics education at the institutions and ways in which participation in the CLTs has changed their programs.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1434442
Funding Period: 
Fri, 08/01/2014 - Sun, 07/31/2016
Full Description: 

The quality of the mathematical education provided to teachers and ultimately to their students depends on the quality of teacher educators at the colleges and universities. For several decades, there has been a shortage of well-prepared mathematics teacher educators. Doctoral programs in mathematics education are the primary ways that these teacher educators learn the content and methods that they need to prepare teachers, but the quality of these programs varies and the number of qualified graduates has been insufficient to meet the demand.

This project will research the programmatic changes that resulted from the NSF investment in Centers for Learning and Teaching of Mathematics (CLT) at the 31 participating institutions. It will provide information on the core elements of doctoral preparation in mathematics education at the institutions and ways in which participation in the CLTs has changed their programs. It will also gather data on the number of doctorates in mathematics education from the CLT institutions prior to the establishment of the CLT and after their CLT ended. A comparison group of Doctoral granting institutions will be studied over the same time frame to determine the number of doctoral students graduated during similar time frames as the CLTs. Follow-up data from graduates of the CLTs will be gathered to identify programmatic strengths and weaknesses as graduates will be asked to reflect on how their doctoral preparation aligned with their current career path. The research questions are: What were the effects of CLTs on the production of new doctorates in mathematics education? What changes were made to doctoral programs in mathematics education by the CLT institutions? How well prepared were the CLT graduates for various career paths?

Centers for Learning and Teaching: Research to Identify Changes in Mathematics Education Doctoral Preparation and the Production of New Doctorates

Overview of the Chemistry Education Research Doctoral Scholars Program

Author(s): 
McClary, LaKeisha
Bretz, Stacey Lowery
Contact Info: 
Publication Type: 
Unpublished
Publication Date: 
In Press

NCLT: A Center to Develop Nanoscale Science and Engineering Educators with Leadership Capabilities

The Nanoscale Science and Engineering Education (NSEE) Center for Learning and Teaching (NCLT) would focus on the research and development of nano-science instructional resources for grades 7-16, related professional development opportunities for 7-12 teachers, and programs infused with nano-science content for education doctoral students.
Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
0426328
Funding Period: 
Fri, 10/01/2004 - Thu, 09/30/2010
Full Description: 

The Nanoscale Science and Engineering Education (NSEE) Center for Learning and Teaching (NCLT) would focus on the research and development of nano-science instructional resources for grades 7-16, related professional development opportunities for 7-12 teachers, and programs infused with nano-science content for education doctoral students.

The Center would bring together educators and scientists from several areas of nano-science and engineering research to collaborate with science teachers and doctoral candidates in education on both the development of the resources and research on their efficacy. The PI has prior experience as director of the Materials World Modules project, an NSF-funded curriculum currently in use in several secondary schools across the country. Lead partners in the proposed Center are Northwestern University, Purdue University, University of Michigan, University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Additional partners include Argonne National Laboratory, West Point Military Academy, Alabama A & M University, Fisk University, Hampton University, Morehouse College and University of Texas at El Paso. The additional partners will widen the geographic range of the project, expanding opportunities to reach a diverse and currently underrepresented population of graduate students, teachers and ultimately students.

STEM and Education faculty and researchers from the partner institutions would participate in interdisciplinary teams to address the Center's mission:

  • Provide national education leadership and resources for advancing NSEE
  • Create and implement professional development programs in NSEE
  • Use innovative ideas in learning to design instructional materials for grades 7-16
  • Conduct research relating to integration of NSEE into science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.
NCLT: A Center to Develop Nanoscale Science and Engineering Educators with Leadership Capabilities

CAREER: Examining the Role of Context in the Mathematical Learning of Young Children

This project involves a longitudinal, ethnographic study of children's mathematical performances from preschool to first grade in both formal classroom settings and informal settings at school and home. The study seeks to identify opportunities for mathematical learning, to map varied performances of mathematical competence, to chart changes in mathematical performance over time, and to design and assess the impact of case studies for teacher education.

Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
0844445
Funding Period: 
Mon, 06/15/2009 - Tue, 05/31/2011
Full Description: 

This project involves a longitudinal, ethnographic study of children's mathematical performances from preschool to first grade in both formal classroom settings and informal settings at school and home. The proposed site for the study is a small, predominately African-American pk-12 school. The study seeks to identify opportunities for mathematical learning by young children across multiple contexts, to map varied performances of mathematical competence by young children, to chart changes in young children's mathematical performance over time, and to design and assess the impact of case studies for teacher education that explore young children's mathematical competencies. Research questions focus on mathematical opportunities for learning in various contexts, children's development of knowledge, skills, and dispositions over time, the characteristics of competent mathematical performances, and the role of case studies in helping beginning teachers to understand young minority children's mathematical thinking. Data collected will include video tapes of classroom activities, written fieldnotes of formal and informal settings, student work, parent focus group transcripts, and children's interview performances. Analysis will involve both thematic coding and construction of case studies. The overarching goal of this project is to transform the ways that researchers think about and study the mathematical learning of young minority children as well as the quality of schooling these children experience.

CAREER: Examining the Role of Context in the Mathematical Learning of Young Children

Chemistry Education Research Doctoral Scholars Program (Bretz, Lewis, Mayberry)

Presenter(s): 
Stacey Lowery Bretz
Jennifer Lewis
Maralee Mayberry
Year: 
2009

The Chemistry Education Research Doctoral Scholars Program aims to recruit, train and graduate a diverse group of scholars in chemistry education research (CER) who specialize in assessment; design coursework, K-12 partnerships, research experiences, and mentoring to successfully prepare these scholars for careers in CER; and create a community of scholars to collaborate and systematically improve assessment of student learning.

What Knowledge Mediates Teachers’ Appropriation of High Leverage Practices? (Cartier, Lancaster)

Presenter(s): 
Jennifer Cartier
Leslie Lancaster
Year: 
2009

What Knowledge Mediates Teachers’ Appropriation of High Leverage Practices?
Jennifer Cartier, University of Pittsburgh; Leslie Lancaster, Vanderbilt University

This session presents an instrument for measuring preservice elementary teachers’ application of instructional planning practices and discusses the relationship between these practices and teachers’ knowledge.

Cyber-enabled Design Research to Enhance Teachers' Critical Thinking Using a Major Video Collection on Children's Mathematical Reasoning (Collaborative Research: Maher)

This project is working to create a cyber infrastructure that supports development and documentation of additional interventions for teacher professional development using the video collection, as well as other videos that might be added in the future by teacher educators or researchers, including those working in other STEM domains.

Lead Organization(s): 
Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
0822204
Funding Period: 
Mon, 09/15/2008 - Fri, 08/31/2012
Full Description: 

The Video Mosaic Collaborative features  videos of student mathematics reasoning,  tools and services to encourage learning, research and practices fostering the development of student reasoning.  The VMC is a collection and service portal intended to support three primary audiences—teacher educators and their pre-service and in-service students, practicing teachers, and researchers.  The Video Mosaic Collaborative features a 22-year longitudinal study of students’ mathematical reasoning skills as they are developed from elementary through high school grades.  The VMC has been carefully designed to leverage the insights and strategies that can be mined in this extensive and unique video collection featuring observations, interventions and interviews with students solving mathematics problems in the classroom and in informal learning settings.  A careful metadata strategy was designed by the library and education research partners in collaboration to capture elements for searching that include forms of reasoning and heuristics, math strand, math problem, NCTM standards, grade level and type of educational environment.  Students and researchers are identified and can be individually tracked through the collection.  Transcripts, student work and dissertations resulting from the videos are linked in metadata.  Tools, such as the VMCAnalytic, a video annotation and analysis tool, are provided to enable registered participants to reuse the videos for instruction, study and research by creating personal clips and combining clips to accomplish research goals such as demonstrating changes in reasoning for an individual student studying probability over several video sessions.  Unlike other video annotation tool, the VMC analytic creates  XML-based independent resources that can be kept private in the researcher’s workspace but that can also be shared.  Shared analytics will be mined for keywords, which will retrieve the video(s) being analyzed, thus adding user tagging to the metadata for the videos.  The analytic resources created are not independently searched and displayed but will display as part of the context for the videos in the collection, along with student work, dissertations, and ultimately published articles, etc., all of which form the critical context of research and study surrounding each video.

Different search strategies, guidance in using videos and opportunities to consult or collaborate with others will be provided for each primary audience of the VMC.  The latest iteration of the portal, with collections and services available for immediate use, will be presented and demonstrated at the DRK12 Principal Investigators’ meeting poster session.  Visitors to the poster will be encouraged to search the portal and to create a small analytic, in a hands-on, interactive one on one demonstration.  We believe that the VMC makes a unique and significant contribution to the efforts of teacher educators, practicing teachers and researchers to discover insights and develop innovative strategies to support the development of student reasoning in mathematics education.

Cyber-enabled Design Research to Enhance Teachers' Critical Thinking Using a Major Video Collection on Children's Mathematical Reasoning (Collaborative Research: Maher)

CEIN: Predictive Toxicology Assessment and Safe Implementation of Nanotechnology in the Environment

This project establishes a Center to conduct research and education on the interactions of nanomaterials with living systems and with the abiotic environment. The research combines high throughput screening assays with computational and physiological modeling to predict impacts at higher levels of biological organization. It will unite the fields of engineering, chemistry, physics, materials science, cell biology, ecology, toxicology, computer modeling, and risk assessment to establish the foundations of a new scientific discipline: environmental nanotoxicology.

Award Number: 
0830117
Funding Period: 
Mon, 09/01/2008 - Sat, 08/31/2013
CEIN: Predictive Toxicology Assessment and Safe Implementation of Nanotechnology in the Environment

Investigating the Critical Junctures: Strategies that Broaden Minority Participation in STEM Fields

This project conducts a systematic and empirical (both quantitative and qualitative) longitudinal study of the factors that influence students' decisions at critical junctures in the educational pipeline. The goals are too (a) broaden participation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields and (b) improve the recruitment, retention, and success of minority undergraduate men in STEM and STEM-related fields across colleges and universities in the United States.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1132141
Funding Period: 
Fri, 08/15/2008 - Tue, 07/31/2012
Investigating the Critical Junctures: Strategies that Broaden Minority Participation in STEM Fields

Conference Series for Recent Graduates and Advanced Doctoral Students in Mathematics Education

The Service, Teaching, and Research (STaR) Project supports networking of early career professionals in mathematics education in higher education. Summer conferences and academic year networking allow time for trust and collegiality to develop, and thereby provide opportunities for important issues/challenges to be identified and addressed. This sustained effort promotes networking, constructs an environment that allows working research groups to be established, and provides time for significant professional growth and leadership capacity to flourish.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
0922410
Funding Period: 
Tue, 09/01/2009 - Sat, 08/31/2013
Project Evaluator: 
Doug Grouws
Full Description: 

The Service, Teaching and Research (STaR) Project is an induction program for recent doctoral graduates in mathematics education. The program, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a 12-month experience that networks early career mathematics educators (in the first or second year of their first academic appointment). The Program focuses on three themes (research, teaching, service) as well as leadership development. The project is designed to mirror the MAA Project NExT experience that has been well established for early career mathematicians.

The initial STaR experience includes a 5-day summer institute in conjunction with the Park City Mathematics Institute (PCMI) in Park City, Utah. STaR Fellows communicate throughout the academic year and regroup in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE).

The Program was designed, in part, to respond to the shortage of people with doctorates in mathematics education.  Once a person completes their degree and secures a position in higher education, it is important to them, their institution and the field that they succeed.  New faculty members face many challenges as they set about establishing a career path that will lead to promotion and tenure. The STaR Program is designed to help early career mathematics educators address some of these challenges.

Participation in the STaR Program is competitive and selection for each new cohort is based on a set of application materials submitted by the applicant.

The first cohort of STaR Fellows includes 44 faculty from 42 different academic institutions (about half with appointments in departments of mathematics and the other half with appointments in departments of education. The summer institute for the first cohort was held the week of July 11, 2010.  The second cohort of STaR Fellows will be recruited in the fall of 2010.  For more information, see:

http://matheddb.missouri.edu/star2/index.htm or contact the Project Director, Robert Reys (reysr@missouri.edu), University of Missouri.

Conference Series for Recent Graduates and Advanced Doctoral Students in Mathematics Education
Syndicate content