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Cognitive Science

First Name: 
Jonathan Vitale
LinkedIn URL: 
https://www.linkedin.com/pub/jonathan-vitale
Professional Title: 
Postdoctoral Scholar
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
Jonathan Vitale is a postdoctoral researcher working under the direction of Marcia Linn at the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Jonathan currently works to design curriculum, assessments, and research interventions for the NSF-supported project, “GRIDS: Graphing Research on Inquiry with Data in Science.” Jonathan has a background as a high school teacher, working in New York City. Following his teaching experience, Jonathan completed his Ph.D. in Cognitive Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University. For his graduate research Jonathan primarily focused on methods of combining digital tools, physical manipulatives, and gesture to help children learn mathematics. In his current role with GRIDS Jonathan is applying this experience to graphing in science, where students frequently demonstrate difficulty interpreting, constructing, and critiquing graphs representing authentic data. Jonathan hopes to continue working at the intersection of math, science, and technology in future roles as a researcher.
First Name: 
Yvonne Kao
Organization/Institution: 
First Name: 
Jeff Greene
Professional Title: 
Associate Professor
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
Jeff Greene received his Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Maryland in August 2007. He holds a Master of Arts degree in measurement, statistics and evaluation, and a Master of Education degree in college student personnel, both from the University of Maryland. He received his baccalaureate degree in psychology from Carleton College in Minnesota. Greene’s research focuses upon particular aspects of digital literacy, such as student cognition, regulation and beliefs in science and history domains. Specifically, he studies self-regulated learning, or how students’ knowledge, beliefs and characteristics interact with their ability to actively and adaptively monitor and control their learning, motivation, behavior and context. He also examines epistemic cognition, or how students think about knowledge and the ways in which those views influence learning. He is also interested in the interactions among self-regulated learning, student beliefs, and online learning. His recently funded projects include a study of how students self-regulate while using digital libraries, and investigations of how classroom discourse can be used to foster critical-analytic thinking, epistemic cognition, and learning outcomes. His research includes both experimental and non-experimental designs as well as quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods methods. Greene publishes his research in professional journals including Educational Psychologist, the Journal of Educational Psychology, Contemporary Educational Psychology, Review of Educational Research, Journal of Educational Computing Research and Instructional Science. Greene is Associate Editor of Metacognition & Learning, and is on the editorial board of Educational Psychologist, Contemporary Educational Psychology, Science Education, and The Journal of Experimental Education. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Psychological Association, the American Educational Research Association, the International Society of Learning Sciences, and Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society.
Cognitive Science
First Name: 
May Jadallah
Professional Title: 
Assistant Professor
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
My research focuses on cognitive sciences of learning and teaching with a special interest in examining the impact of small-group collaborative discussions on children’s cognitive and social development. I am particularly interested in understanding how teachers facilitate these discussions to promote children’s reasoning and multi-step causal reasoning to explore issues related to learning digital mapping technology in upper elementary grades.
Cognitive Science
First Name: 
Firat Soylu
Professional Title: 
Postdoctoral Fellow
Organization/Institution: 
First Name: 
Kreshnik Begolli
Professional Title: 
MA
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
Kreshnik Begolli is a 4th year PhD. Student in the Department of Education at the University of California, Irvine. He is primarily interested in how cognitive science research can help make improvements in education. Kreshnik studies paradigms in analogical reasoning, language acquisition, and perceptual learning in an effort to better understand the way we abstract complex patterns from our environment and reason inductively. As a complement to this line of research, Kreshnik is also interested in uncovering and developing optimal learning schedules in the hopes of creating learning environments that are adaptive to each learner's style. This inquiry led him to pursue his B.S. degree in Cognitive Science at UCLA, where he graduated with Departmental and Collegial Honors, A Specialization in Computing, and a Minor in Linguistics.
First Name: 
Jennifer Darrah
Professional Title: 
7th grade Science and Math RtI
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
I'm have returned from working in Panama City, Panama. I am trying to rebuild my science material all over again. I work as a 7th grade science teacher for one general education class and one special needs. I also, am responsible for the middle school math RtI process.
First Name: 
Stephanie Spiris
Professional Title: 
Teacher
First Name: 
S. Lynneth Solis
Professional Title: 
Doctoral Student
Organization/Institution: 
About Me (Bio): 
S. Lynneth Solis is a graduate of the Mind, Brain, and Education program and a current doctoral student in Human Development and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research interests focus on the study of conceptual development. What are the cognitive processes that lead children to evermore complex conceptions of phenomena in the world? Furthermore, how can adults—educators and parents—best support these cognitive processes to guide children in the acquisition of deep understandings? In the Learning About Complex Causality in the Classroom project, I am involved in studies looking at the way children best learn and understand complex causal models in science learning. One study investigates how young children interpret mutually causal phenomena (as in symbiosis), in which the cause-effect interaction pattern is not unidirectional. Another study looks at students’ ideas about action at a distance. Two other projects study students' understanding of probabilistic and distributed causation.
Cognitive Science
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