Handbook/Manual

Sonified Interactive Simulations for Accessible Middle School STEM

For this project, researchers will iteratively develop simulations to include sonifications, non-speech sounds that represent visual information, aimed at enhancing accessibility for all learners, but particularly for those with visual impairments to produce sonified simulations, professional development resources, design guidelines and exemplars, and publications.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1621363
Funding Period: 
Sat, 10/01/2016 to Mon, 09/30/2019
Full Description: 

Students with disabilities often have fewer opportunities for experiential learning, an important component of quality STEM education. Computer based simulations in science can provide valuable opportunities for these students to experience and manipulate natural phenomena related to critical STEM ideas. However, existing simulations remain largely inaccessible to students with visual impairments in particular. Recent advances in technology related to sonification use with simulations can make it possible for these students to have a more complete and authentic experience. Sonification is the use of non-speech sounds, such as musical tones, to represent visual information including data. Such sounds can be manipulated temporally and spatially and can also vary by amplitude and frequency to convey information that is more traditionally displayed visually. 

Researchers will iteratively develop five middle school physical science simulations to include sonifications aimed at enhancing accessibility for all learners, but particularly for those with visual impairments. Data collection activities will include focus groups and interviews with students and teachers focused on engagement. The end products of this project will include sonified simulations, professional development resources, design guidelines and exemplars, and publications.

InquirySpace 2: Broadening Access to Integrated Science Practices

This project will create technology-enhanced classroom activities and resources that increase student learning of science practices in high school biology, chemistry, and physics. InquirySpace will incorporate several innovative technological and pedagogical features that will enable students to undertake scientific experimentation that closely mirrors current science research and learn what it means to be a scientist.

Lead Organization(s): 
Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1621301
Funding Period: 
Thu, 09/15/2016 to Tue, 08/31/2021
Full Description: 

This project will create technology-enhanced classroom activities and resources that increase student learning of science practices in high school biology, chemistry, and physics courses. The project addresses the urgent national priority to improve science education as envisioned in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by focusing less on learning facts and equations and instead providing students with the time, skills, and resources to experience the conduct of science and what it means to be a scientist. This project builds on prior work that created a sequence of physics activities that significantly improved students' abilities to undertake data-based experiments and led to productive independent investigations. The goal of the InquirySpace project is to improve this physics sequence, extend the approach to biology and chemistry, and adapt the materials to the needs of diverse students by integrating tailored formative feedback in real time. The result will be student and teacher materials that any school can use to allow students to experience the excitement and essence of scientific investigations as an integral part of science instruction. The project plans to create and iteratively revise learning materials and technologies, and will be tested in 48 diverse classroom settings. The educational impact of the project's approach will be compared with that of business-as-usual approaches used by teachers to investigate to what extent it empowers students to undertake self-directed experiments. To facilitate the widest possible use of the project, a complete set of materials, software, teacher professional development resources, and curriculum design documents will be available online at the project website, an online teacher professional development course, and teacher community sites. The Discovery Research K-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools (RMTs). Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects.

InquirySpace will incorporate several innovative technological and pedagogical features that will enable students to undertake scientific experimentation that closely mirrors current science research. These features will include (1) educational games to teach data analysis and interpretation skills needed in the approach, (2) reduced dependence on reading and writing through the use of screencast instructions and reports, (3) increased reliance on graphical analysis that can make equations unnecessary, and (4) extensive use of formative feedback generated from student logs. The project uses an overarching framework called Parameter Space Reasoning (PSR) to scaffold students through a type of experimentation applicable to a very large class of experiments. PSR involves an integrated set of science practices related to a question that can be answered with a series of data collection runs for different values of independent variables. Data can be collected from sensors attached to the computer, analysis of videos, scientific databases, or computational models. A variety of visual analytic tools will be provided to reveal patterns in the graphs. Research will be conducted in three phases: design and development of technology-enhanced learning materials through design-based research, estimation of educational impact using a quasi-experimental design, and feasibility testing across diverse classroom settings. The project will use two analytical algorithms to diagnose students' learning of data analysis and interpretation practices so that teachers and students can modify their actions based on formative feedback in real time. These algorithms use computationally optimized calculations to model the growth of student thinking and investigation patterns and provide actionable information to teachers and students almost instantly. Because formative feedback can improve instruction in any field, this is a major development that has wide potential.

Developing Teachers as Computational Thinkers Through Supported Authentic Experiences in Computing Modeling and Simulation

This project addresses the need for a computationally-enabled STEM workforce by equipping teachers with the skills necessary to prepare students for future endeavors as computationally-enabled scientists and citizens, and by investigating the most effective ways to provide this instruction to teachers. The project also addresses the immediate challenge presented by NGSS to prepare middle school science teachers to implement rich computational thinking experiences within science classes.

Partner Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1639069
Funding Period: 
Fri, 01/01/2016 to Sun, 06/30/2019
Full Description: 

The Discovery Research K-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools (RMTs). Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects.

This project addresses the need for a computationally-enabled STEM workforce by equipping teachers with the skills necessary to prepare students for future endeavors as computationally-enabled scientists and citizens, and by investigating the most effective ways to provide this instruction to teachers. The project also addresses the immediate challenge presented by the Next Generation Science Standards to prepare middle school science teachers to implement rich computational thinking (CT) experiences, such as the use, creation and analysis of computer models and simulations, within science classes.

The project, a partnership between the Santa Fe Institute and the Santa Fe Public School District, directly addresses middle school teachers' understanding, practice, and teaching of modern scientific practice. Using the Project GUTS program and professional development model as a foundation, this project will design and develop a set of Resources, Models, and Tools (RMTs) that collectively form the basis for a comprehensive professional development (PD) program, then study teachers' experiences with the RMTs and assess how well the RMTs prepared teachers to implement the curriculum. The PD program includes: an online PD network; workshops; webinars and conferences; practicum and facilitator support; and curricular and program guides. The overall approach to the project is design based implementation research (DBIR). Methods used for the implementation research includes: unobtrusive measures such as self-assessment sliders and web analytics; the knowledge and skills survey (KS-CT); interviews (teachers and the facilitators); analysis of teacher modified and created models; and observations of practicum and classroom implementations. Data collection and analysis in the implementation research serve two purposes: a) design refinement and b) case study development. The implementation research employs a mixed-method, nonequivalent group design with embedded case studies.

Supports for Elementary Teachers Implementing the NGSS: Challenges and Opportunities across Science, Technology, and Engineering

STEM Categorization: 
Day: 
Fri

Consider methods and challenges associated with supporting upper elementary teachers’ implementation of NGSS-based classroom interventions in this structured poster session.

Date/Time: 
9:15 am to 10:45 am
Session Materials: 

In this structured poster session, a set of projects will present and discuss resources, models, and tools (RMTs) designed to support upper elementary teachers to implement an array of curricular and instructional interventions reflecting diverse disciplinary concepts and practices embodied in NGSS. The session aims to provide a forum for exploring diverse approaches to improving science in 3rd-5th-grade classrooms and engage in discussion about how these ideas can advance systemic efforts to support quality science instruction and student learning. 

Session Types: 

PlantingScience: Digging Deeper Together - A Model for Collaborative Teacher/Scientist Professional Development

This project will design, develop, and test a new professional development (PD) model for high school biology teachers that focuses on plant biology, an area of biology that teachers feel less prepared to teach. The new PD model will bring teachers and scientists together, in-person and online, to guide students in conducting authentic science investigations and to reflect on instructional practices and student learning.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1502892
Funding Period: 
Thu, 10/01/2015 to Mon, 09/30/2019
Full Description: 

This project will design, develop, and test a new professional development (PD) model for high school biology teachers that focuses on plant biology, an area of biology that teachers feel less prepared to teach. The new PD model will bring teachers and scientists together, in-person and online, to guide students in conducting authentic science investigations and to reflect on instructional practices and student learning. The project will also develop and test the outcomes of a summer institute for teachers and a website that will support the online mentoring of students and the professional development of teachers. Outcomes of the project will include the development of a facilitation guide for the teacher professional development model, a website to support student mentoring and teacher professional development, a series of resources for teachers and scientists to use in working with students, and empirical evidence of the success of the new professional development model.

This full research and development project will employ a pre-test/post-test control group design to test the efficacy of a professional development model for high school biology teachers. The professional development model is grounded in a theory of action based on the premise that when teachers are engaged with scientists and students in a technology-enabled learning community, students will demonstrate higher levels of achievement than those using more traditional instructional materials and methodologies. The means of post-intervention outcome measures will be compared across treatment and comparison groups in a cluster-randomized trial where teachers will be randomly assigned to treatment groups. The study will recruit a nation-wide sample to ensure that participants represent a wide array of geographic and demographic contexts, with preference given to Title 1 schools. The research questions are: a) To what extent does participation in the Digging Deeper community of teachers and scientists affect teacher knowledge and practices? b) To what extent does participation in the Digging Deeper community of teachers and scientists affect scientists? quality of mentorship and teaching? And c) To what extent does student use of the online program and participation in the learning community with scientist mentors affect student learning? Instruments will be developed or adapted to measure relevant student and teacher knowledge, student motivation, and teacher practices. Computer-mediated discourse analysis will be used over the course of the study to track online interactions among students, teachers, and science mentors.

Stopping an Epidemic of Misinformation: Leveraging the K-12 Science Education System to Respond to Ebola

This project will develop resources for teachers and administrators that will provide instructional guidance for teaching about the Ebola virus and other epidemics of infectious diseases that may arise. The resources developed will include guidelines for administrators and teachers, as well as policy briefs related to teaching and learning about Ebola.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1520689
Funding Period: 
Sun, 03/01/2015 to Mon, 02/29/2016
Full Description: 

The Discovery Research K-12 (DRK-12) program supports projects that enhance learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics by preK-12 students, teachers, administrators, and parents. This project will contribute to that mission by developing resources for teachers and administrators that will provide instructional guidance for teaching about the Ebola virus and other epidemics of infectious diseases that may arise. The resources to be developed will include guidelines for administrators and teachers, and these resources will be distributed both in print form and through the Web portals of project partners, including the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), the National Science Education Leadership Association (NSELA), and the Council of State Science Supervisors (CSSS). Policy briefs related to teaching and learning about Ebola and will be tailored for specific organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Education Association. The informational needs of teachers and administrators will be determined through large-scale surveys of teachers and science supervisors of school districts and states. The resources developed by the project are expected to have broad impacts nationwide in helping schoolteachers and administrators respond constructively to the spread of misinformation that often accompanies outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as Ebola.

To determine the informational needs of teachers and administrators, the project will develop and administer three surveys: a teacher survey, a survey for school district science supervisors, and a survey for state science supervisors. The surveys will probe knowledge about Ebola and infectious diseases, where respondents get their information, how such information is incorporated into instruction, and what factors affect their responses. Survey items will be validated through expert review and follow-up cognitive interviews with a subset of responders. The project intends to survey 3,000 teachers and all members of NSELA and CSSS. Findings from the surveys and related interviews will be used to develop informational materials and policy briefs that can be used by teachers and districts to guide instructional practices and policies related to teaching about Ebola and related epidemics. Science teachers are uniquely positioned to counteract the spread of misinformation that often accompanies quickly emerging, science-related issues, and this project has the potential to provide much-needed guidance in providing reasoned, constructive responses.

Teachers with GUTS: Developing Teachers as Computational Thinkers Through Supported Authentic Experiences in Computing Modeling and Simulation

This project directly addresses middle school teachers' understanding, practice, and teaching of modern scientific practice. Using the Project GUTS program and professional development model as a foundation, this project will design and develop a set of Resources, Models, and Tools (RMTs) that collectively form the basis for a comprehensive professional development (PD) program, then study teachers' experiences with the RMTs and assess how well the RMTs prepared teachers to implement the curriculum.

Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1503383
Funding Period: 
Mon, 06/01/2015 to Thu, 06/30/2016
Full Description: 

This project addresses the need for a computationally-enabled STEM workforce by equipping teachers with the skills necessary to prepare students for future endeavors as computationally-enabled scientists and citizens, and by investigating the most effective ways to provide this instruction to teachers. The project also addresses the immediate challenge presented by the Next Generation Science Standards to prepare middle school science teachers to implement rich computational thinking (CT) experiences, such as the use, creation and analysis of computer models and simulations, within science classes. 

The project, a partnership between the Santa Fe Institute and the Santa Fe Public School District, directly addresses middle school teachers' understanding, practice, and teaching of modern scientific practice. Using the Project GUTS program and professional development model as a foundation, this project will design and develop a set of Resources, Models, and Tools (RMTs) that collectively form the basis for a comprehensive professional development (PD) program, then study teachers' experiences with the RMTs and assess how well the RMTs prepared teachers to implement the curriculum. The PD program includes: an online PD network; workshops; webinars and conferences; practicum and facilitator support; and curricular and program guides. The overall approach to the project is design based implementation research (DBIR). Methods used for the implementation research includes: unobtrusive measures such as self-assessment sliders and web analytics; the knowledge and skills survey (KS-CT); interviews (teachers and the facilitators); analysis of teacher modified and created models; and observations of practicum and classroom implementations. Data collection and analysis in the implementation research serve two purposes: a) design refinement and b) case study development. The implementation research employs a mixed-method, nonequivalent group design with embedded case studies.

View videos from their Foundations unit:

 

Design and Execution of a Design Laboratory (Learning Lab) for STEM Projects

Networked Improvement Communities (NICs) are a structure for redefining the relationship between education research and development and practice so as to more effectively address real problems in order to produce knowledge that can meaningfully contribute to improvement. This project provides an opportunity to learn how best to implement NIC principles so as to realize their potential to support STEM initiatives.

Award Number: 
1445853
Funding Period: 
Sun, 02/15/2015 to Sun, 01/31/2016
Full Description: 

Networked Improvement Communities (NICs) are a structure for redefining the relationship between education research and development and practice so as to more effectively address real problems in order to produce knowledge that can meaningfully contribute to improvement. NICs are scientific learning communities distinguished by essential characteristics: they are focused on a well-specified common aim, guided by a deep understanding of the problem and a shared working theory of how to improve it. NICs are committed to the rigor of improvement science and are coordinated to accelerate the development, testing and refinement of interventions. NICs also diffuse their knowledge to the field more rapidly and work to integrate their findings into varied educational contexts. This project provides an opportunity to learn how best to implement NIC principles so as to realize their potential to support STEM initiatives. 

A NIC Design Learning Laboratory is a series of learning sessions in which participants are convened together and are interspersed between action periods in their local contexts leading to the formation networks. At each learning session, significant knowledge about the developmental stage of NIC design and initiation is introduced. During the action periods, teams follow through on ideas introduced and plans established. Subsequent learning sessions offer design teams the opportunity for coaching on particular problems that may arise and to encounter the ideas and work to be addressed in the next developmental stage. Participants learn the ideas of NIC conceptualization and initiation by working on launching their own networks, with the training and guidance relevant to each step in NIC development provided by Carnegie and colleagues in the Learning Lab. The focus for the learning sessions includes technical skill and leadership development and forming learning community networks related to STEM goals.

At the end of the Learning Laboratory the following will be produced: 1) a NIC Design Learning Laboratory for STEM Projects that would support up to five project teams as they plan, initiate and launch NICs; 2) an Assessors Guide to document the essential elements of NICs and their expression in programmatic thinking; 3) A Design and Operational Plan and timeline for each of the participating teams guiding the establishment of their NIC as would constitute the centerpiece for their plans and possible proposal for seeking support; 4) A final report drawing upon the Developmental Evaluation and External Review.

Teacher's Guide to the Mathematics and Science Resources of the ELPD Framework

This two-year project will develop, pilot, validate, and publish a Teacher's Guide to the Science and Mathematics Resources of the ELPD Framework. This guide and related materials will translate the key science and mathematics concepts, ideas, and practices found within the ELPD Framework into classroom resources for direct use by teachers, schools, and districts to support English learners (ELs).

Award Number: 
1346491
Funding Period: 
Sun, 09/01/2013 to Mon, 08/31/2015
Full Description: 

The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) coordinated the development of a document addressing the implementation of Standards as guided by a framework for English Language Proficiency Development Standards (ELPD Framework). The expressed purpose of the ELPD Framework is to provide guidance to states on how to develop and use tools for the creation and evaluation of ELP standards. Once published, it became immediately apparent that the ELPD Framework would be of great help to teachers. However, the Framework was written specifically for those tasked with the responsibility to develop, adopt, or adapt state ELPD standards and assessments that support the language demands of STEM education grounded in learning performances that cojoin concepts with practices. That is, it has a technical focus rather than an instructional focus. There is an immediate need to develop and validate such a tool in states that have adopted Standards-based models, since educational agencies are now building teachers capacities to implement these standards.

This two-year project will develop, pilot, validate, and publish a Teacher's Guide to the Science and Mathematics Resources of the ELPD Framework. This guide and related materials will translate the key science and mathematics concepts, ideas, and practices found within the ELPD Framework into classroom resources for direct use by teachers, schools, and districts to support English learners (ELs).

Resources supporting ELs at different language proficiency levels in science and mathematics classrooms are sparse. Classroom-based resources supporting ELs' academic language development in science and mathematics based on career and college readiness standards are non-existent. The development of such a resource would have significant impact on science and mathematics teachers' teaching of ELs. Understanding how teachers' practice in supporting content-based academic language changes by using such a resource would be of great value for teachers, administrators, and researchers. Arguably, the ELPD Framework (and the proposed teacher's guide) has applications beyond ELs. Many challenges "at-risk" students face in science and mathematics classes may not be due to a lack in content knowledge, per se, but a lack of ability to communicate in the language of the content. The proposed teacher's guide could help teachers support all students in the language underlying the science and mathematics standards in the CCSS and NGSS.

High Adventure Science: Earths Systems and Sustainability

This project is developing modules for middle school and high school students in Earth and Space Science classes, testing the hypothesis that students who use computational models, analyze real-world data, and engage in building scientific reasoning and argumentation skills are better able to understand Earth science core ideas and how humans impact Earth's systems. The resulting online curriculum modules and teacher guides provide exciting examples of next generation Earth science teaching and learning materials.

Project Email: 
Lead Organization(s): 
Award Number: 
1220756
Funding Period: 
Mon, 10/01/2012 to Fri, 09/30/2016
Project Evaluator: 
Karen Mutch-Jones
Full Description: 

We have entered the Anthropocene, an age when the actions of seven billion humans have increasing influence on the Earth. The High-Adventure Science: Earth Systems and Sustainability project is developing modules for middle school and high school students in Earth and Space Science classes, testing the hypothesis that students who use computational models, analyze real-world data, and engage in building scientific reasoning and argumentation skills are better able to understand Earth science core ideas and how humans impact Earth's systems. The Concord Consortium in partnership with the University of California Santa Cruz and the National Geographic Society are co-developing these modules, conducting targeted research on how the modules enhance students' higher order thinking skills and understanding of human-Earth interactions, and broadly disseminating these materials via far-reaching education networks.

The High-Adventure Science: Earth Systems and Sustainability project is creating online, middle and high school curriculum modules that feature computational models and cover five topics: climate change, fresh water availability, fossil fuel utilization, resource sustainability, and land use management. At the same time, the project team is conducting design studies to look at how specific features, prompts, argumentation and evaluation tools built into the modules affect student understanding of core Earth science concepts. The design studies promote rapid, iterative module development and help to identify features that support student learning, as well as scientific reasoning, scientific argumentation with uncertainty, systems thinking, and model-based experimentation skills. For each module, pre- and posttest data, embedded assessments, student surveys, classroom observations, teacher interviews and surveys, provide important information to rapidly improve module features, content, and usability. The final, high-quality, project materials are being made available to a national audience through the National Geographic Society as well as through the High-Adventure Science: Earth Systems and Sustainability website hosted at the Concord Consortium.

It is essential that students graduate from high school with a solid understanding of the scientific concepts that help explain how humans impact Earth systems, and conversely, how Earth processes impact humans. The High-Adventure Science: Earth Systems and Sustainability project provides a unique, research-based approach to conveying to students core Earth science content, crosscutting concepts, and fundamental practices of science. The resulting online curriculum modules and teacher guides provide exciting examples of next generation Earth science teaching and learning materials, and the research findings provide new insights on how students learn core science concepts and gain critical scientific skills.

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